Forbidden Freedom In Kate Chopin's The Story Of An Hour

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Forbidden Freedom
In history, human rights have always been a problem, and yet to this day, it still remains. Specifically, in the past, women had adapted to live in a suppressed environment, solely because their limited rights have never allowed them to cross a certain boundary. In fact, the United States, foremost in the race of modernization in the world, enabled women to vote in 1920; however, prior to that, individualism, freedom, and equality did not exist in the dictionary for women. Kate Chopin, the author of “The Story of an Hour” (1849), shows how Mrs Mallard, thinking that she is a widow, transforms her psychology and pursues freedom, a feeling that was very distant from her when her husband was “alive.” Likewise, Susan Glaspell,
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On top, the condition of Mrs Mallard room and Minnie Foster’s house implicitly unravels the life of both women after marriage. In “The Story of an Hour” Mrs Mallard deals with the news of Mr. Brently’s (her husband) death in a very unusual way, such that she initially reacts with a fit of tears; however, shortly, her grief turns into a realization of her freedom, hence happiness in her solitary room. That one hour is her room underlines Mrs Mallard pleasure of being free not only from her husband but the society’s expectations. This whole process of ambitious emotions upon learning that she is a widow indirectly explains how her life was when her husband was alive: a lot of restrictions. Those restrictions directly correspond to the role of wives in the nineteenth century; Anne Humphrey, writer “The Three of Them: The Scene of 'Divorce' in Nineteenth-Century,” adds, “However, there is not much attention paid to divorce in the new woman and marriage-debate novels of the 1880s and 1890s either as an issue or as a plot device” (Humphrey). Considering that women did not even have the right to vote or have their voice to be heard in 1849, let alone Mrs Mallard being able to get a divorce or live the way she wishes to. Thus the nineteenth century setting of the story, alongside the lonely aura of Mrs Mallard (when she comes to feel freedom) delivers that freedom and independence can only be gained in a companionless state, which in this case would have been Mrs. Mallard inside her room (alone), believing her husband is dead. Likewise, in “A Jury of Her Peers” the setting, the early twentieth century and the condition of Minnie Foster’s house, emphasizes the patriarchal oppression and limited rights/freedom for women. As soon as the Mrs Hale and Mrs Peters arrive at her Minnie’s house for

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