Foodshare Case Study

1279 Words 6 Pages
Currently, there are about 850,000 people enrolled in the FoodShare program in Wisconsin. That accumulates to roughly 8.9 billion dollars (Associated Press). FoodShare is a government program intended to provide people (who meet low income requirements) with groceries. This is a helpful resource to many, if used correctly. In the last couple of years, there has been a lot of debate on what regulations and/or stipulations are deemed acceptable in order for people to apply. As of now, anyone who meets the income requirements for food share is qualified to get it. Starting January 01, 2015, single, well bodied people without children, who are unemployed will no longer be eligible for food assistance. They’ll be required to enroll in a government …show more content…
For example, other states require written tests and background checks to flag drug users, by singling out people with drug convictions (Grovum). The individuals flagged, are forced to take an actual drug test. Not requiring a drug test to every person applying or currently receiving FoodShare, will save costs dramatically. Currently, a lot of jobs/careers that we apply for require some sort of drug testing, whether it be for insurance reasons, or a preferred requirement from the employer. Needless to say, if we want that job, we need to drug test. Not requiring the same for welfare programs including but not limited to FoodShare, makes it easier for individuals to continue their present …show more content…
This would assist in lowering prison costs, affectively aiding in the elimination of addiction, and lowering crime rate as well. Leading to economic growth by eventually getting more people jobs, thus, demanding less money spent towards aiding the criminal justice system. Drug users currently using Wisconsin welfare programs are more encouraged to continue their bad habits instead of fixing them, causing higher cost in other areas such as prisons, law enforcement, and other special government agencies devoted to the war on drugs. Making changes to the eligibility requirements of FoodShare will definitely help with a lot of issues going on in Wisconsin. That being said, there needs to be a little leeway on the governments behalf. Right now, to be approved for FoodShare benefits, a family or an individual’s income must be equal to or lower than 200% of the poverty level. For example, a family of 3 must make $1628 or less on a monthly basis to be considered eligible (Wisconsin Department of Health Services). If that family is making the exact amount, it will result in minimum FoodShare. This number is way too low, and needs to be

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