Food Deserts Essay

934 Words 4 Pages
There are several ways which food supplying firms affect households. The household can relocate to an area with a different retail environment; the stores in the neighborhood can change their products, and firms can either leave a neighborhood or enter a new one. When location was controlled for, that was only a marginal difference in expenditure and nutrition scores when lower socioeconomic groups were placed in locations with more healthful options. Stores that change their products often do not change them in accordance to a communities tastes rapidly changing, but would rather enter an entirely new market; community tastes rarely undergo such dramatic shifts in short periods of time. It was observed that households did in fact change where …show more content…
The study concluded that households in census tracts with lower income and education levels purchase less healthful foods. The policies that address access in underserved communities will not do much to turn around disparities in nutritional consumption between socioeconomic groups. More healthful food offerings come at the price of the firm and as an entity motivated by profit, it is not feasible for high-quality retail food locations to be placed in lower-income communities. Households would be discouraged to purchase products here as significantly higher prices than what is readily available would act as a disincentive for an individuals that are financially …show more content…
The research is continuing to evolve, but rarely does science propose a single solution as a panacea to tackle a multilayered problem. From the studies written in this research paper, two solutions can be proposed. The first is to address the problem of suburban sprawl as an unsustainable model for American development. In rural areas, automobile dependence is not a choice, but mandatory to function in society. Single-use zoning has created an inefficient place of living and was evident in the study of SNAP beneficiaries. The great majority of SNAP recipients shopped at supermarkets and they were widely accessible. However, the greatest disparity in consumption was seen in those who households who were located more than five miles away from a supermarket and did not own a car. Addressing this physical dimension to the problems of social equity and obesity is tricky as a call for community improvement can be misconstrued as a call for gentrification and displacement; it has to come in slow, piece meal fashion as opposed to the rapid development of suburbia. For the urban environment, it becomes more of an issue of socioeconomic opportunity. Government intervention can improve health by providing subsidies and tax breaks to high-quality food retailers. This would certainly incentivize entry into a low-and-moderate

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