Florence Nightingale's Role In History: The History Of The Nurse Midwife

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The history of the nurse midwife can be dated back to many centuries. Florence Nightingale, probably the most well known nursing pioneer, was responsible for opening the "Nightingale Training School for Nurses" in 1860 (Selanders & Crane, 2012). In 1893, a facility called the "Henry Street Settlement" was founded by another great nursing pioneer, Lillian Wald, an establishment that was geared toward helping the poor in the lower east side of Manhattan (Britannica, 2013). Mary Breckenridge, a nurse with the Frontier Nursing Service "is considered the founder of nurse midwifery" (Seaton, 2006). Before the birth of these well-known nurses, the midwife was caring for women and delivering babies. The definition of a nurse midwife is "A nurse who …show more content…
Florence Nightingale, the most well-known nurse in history opened the Nightingale Training School for Nurses in 1860 (Selanders & Crane, 2012). By opening this school, it provided a way for respectable training for women in the late 1800s. In 1893, Lillian Wald established a facility called the Henry Street Settlement. The settlement started as a place for the members of the community to meet, started as 3 small houses that were donated by a wealthy business man (Britannica, 2013). Mary Brewster a fellow nurse and friend of Lillian Wald's also started the visiting nurse service and Wald was also known as "the public health nurse" (Britannica, 2013). Nurse pioneer, Mary Breckinridge, was a member of the Frontier Nursing Service and has been referenced as the nurse who formally founded nurse midwifery (Seaton, 2006). Breckinridge made it her lifes work to care for the needy in the mountains of Kentucky (Walker, 2014). In 1925, the Manhattan Midwifery School opened in New York to educate women in the practice of midwife (Walker, …show more content…
The individual that desires to enter this field has options of seeking a formal education. There are three categories of the nurse midwife: The Direct Entry Midwife, the Certified Professional Midwife, and the Certified Nurse Midwife (Seaton, 2006). The direct entry midwife has no formal nursing training and practices in birth centers and homes. The certified professional midwife can obtain certification by doing self-study or apprenticeship. The certified nurse midwife completes her degree by attending an accredited program offered at colleges and universities. To be accepted into the program the applicant must hold a current Registered Nurse License. Upon completion of the program, the nurse will obtain a Master's of Nursing degree (MSN) or Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) (Flynn,

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