Five Stages Of Growth And Decline Of Umran In Ibn Khaldun

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POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA
IN
ISLAMIC THOUGHT & CIVILISATION

A STUDY ON THE FIVE STAGES OF GROWTH AND DECLINE OF UMRAN
IN IBN KHALDUN’S THOUGHT.

ASSIGNMENT IITC 5011

NAME: ROSLI BIN JAMAL

MATRIC NO : G1336667

MODULE : IITC 5011, COMPARATIVE CIVILISATION

LECTURER : PROFESSOR DR ABDULLAH AL-AHSAN

TITLE
A study on the five stages of growth and decline of umran in ibn khaldun’s thought
ABSTRACT

Five stages of growth and decline of Umran in Ibn Khaldun’s thought are as followed.
Stage 1 is the period of establishment where there will be a leader who promote progress in the umran. The next stage is when the leader will monopolise his power and domination in the umran. This is also when the leader secure his position as a ruler
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3) that of leisure and Tranquillity (tawr al-faraj wa-d-dicah).
4) that of contentment and tranquillity (tawr al-qunuuc wa-l-musaalamah), and
5) that of waste and tranquillit (tawr al-israaf wa-l-tabdhiir).

After the fifth stage, the state ¬as an institution¬ should change authority, if civilization is to regenerate itself. But political power, by its nature, claims all glory for itself and goes in for luxury, tranquillity and peace, something which could lead to the decline any banishment of the state.
For the purpose of this paper, the focus will be on Stage 1 , the stage of success as well as Stage 2 which is the stage of the ruler monopolizing power, and will be using Abbasid civilisation as a reference.
The first stage is that of success, the overthrow of all opposition, and the appropriation of royal authority from the preceding dynasty. In this stage, the ruler serves as model to his people by the manner in which he acquires glory, collects taxes, defends property, and provides military protection. He does not claim anything exclusively for himself to the exclusion of (his people), because (such an attitude) is what is required by group feeling, (and it was group feeling) that gave superiority (to the dynasty), and (group feeling) still continues to exist as before
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Mawali were also restricted by a “wala’ “contract to the Arab society if they were to become Muslims1.However, the concept of mawali and the contract were thrown out altogether once the Abbasids came to power and this was the major difference between Abbasids and Umayyads. This also created a surge in the number of soldiers serving the Caliph as non-Arabs joined the army from a multitude of different areas and gave the Abbasid Caliphate a good initial army. The new sense of equality among all Muslims under the Abbasid Empire meant that the soldiers could fight for something far greater than their tribal leaders: their religious nation. It also meant that non-Arabs Muslims can serve anywhere in the government and military institutions and allow the Caliphate to spread even further as societies away from the capital in Baghdad moved from the “Amsar” model to a more autonomous, merit-based system of society where nationality does not matter as much as religion

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