Neutralization Theory In Research

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NEUTRALIZATION THEORY
Neutralization theory comes into play when natural norms do not apply considering the offender has the belief they are justified in their actions, no matter if a law is broken or a victim has been violated in the process (Lilly, Cullen, and Ball, 2011). The best example to use to better explain Neutralization theory would be when a student taking an exam and cheats, the student would justify his or her actions by saying the professor was too hard and the student was unable to understand the material giving him or her the right to cheat (Lilly, Cullen, and Ball, 2011). Sykes and Matza (1957) listed five techniques of neutralization that are as followed: the first technique is refusing to take responsibility for behaviors
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The form of research used was interview based, which gave the researchers a better idea of the mind state and behaviors of the offenders being questioned (Topalli, 2005). There was indications that some of the test subjects denied seriousness for the crimes they have committed as well as crimes committed towards them, such as injury’s or theft (Topalli, 2005)(Page 15). When reading the second article the researchers wanted to find the similarity of neutralizations theory and white-collar crimes (Gottschalk, and Smith, 2011). The researchers came to the conclusion once that data was collected that white-collar crimes is a prime example of neutralization theory considering the offender followed all the techniques that Sykes and Matza described (Gottschalk, and Smith, …show more content…
Sykes and Matza come to the bases of the Neutralization techniques were described in both articles and listed in detail in the textbook for better understanding (Lilly, Cullen, and Ball, 2011). The article titled “When Being Good is Bad: An Expansion of Neutralization Theory” performed research by interviewing several criminal to achieve their reasoning for committing the crimes and why they feel justified in their actions (Topalli, 2005). The research proved the similar actions to the criminal and how the relationship proves to be Neutralization theory (Topalli, 2005). The interviews were expressed in the reading on the behaviors and actions of the offender and how they felt no remorse for their actions, but they saw their actions to be their way of life and correct not wrong (Topalli, 2005).
While reviewing the article titled “Criminal entrepreneurship, white-collar criminality, and neutralization theory”, researchers collected data to determine the relationship between white-collar crimes and neutralization theory (Gottschalk, and Smith, 2011). The research determined that White-Collar crimes is an example of neutralization theory considering they career criminal do not see the fault in their actions, they believe they working for the common goal towards the American Dream (Gottschalk, and Smith,

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