What Is The Great Gatsby's Destruction

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“I have spent my life judging the distance between American reality and the American Dream” (Bruce Springteen). The American dream states that anyone can achieve their dreams no matter their race, gender or social status. In the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, fighting for the American dream is the biggest source for Jay Gatsby’s sadness and despair. Chasing after a dream that is unattainable only causes pain and ultimately results in destruction. Throughout the story, Gatsby craves Daisy Buchannan’s love and though he was a poor boy, that didn’t stop him from pursuing her. He has wondrous dreams of being with her but he faces barriers such as social status and money. Gatsby eventually realizes no matter how much wealth he …show more content…
Gatsby meets the love of his life just before leaving for the war, though at the time it was only meant to be a casual relationship. As Gatsby falls deeper in love he realizes he would do anything to be with her. While talking to Nick he states: “Well, there I was way off my ambitions, getting deeper in love every minute, and all of a sudden I didn’t care” (Fitzgerald.143). Gatsby has ambitions and aspirations to become wealthy and live a luxurious life and after meeting Daisy, these goals become intertwined with wanting her affection. After he leaves for the war Daisy gets married to a well-to-do man named Tom Buchannan leaving Gatsby five years to build his empire and accumulate enough wealth to, in his eyes, sweep Daisy off her feet. When Jordan is telling Nick Mr. Gatsby’s story she states: “Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay” (Fitzgerald.76). Here it is realized the amount of devotion Gatsby has for Daisy. At one point Jordan also points out that the reason he throws these parties is for Daisy. Jay hopes that Daisy would wander into one of these parties and bump into him though this is not entirely true. He throws these parties, not only to attract the attention of Daisy, but also to show off his wealth to her. He wants her to realize that he has the means to support her and their future. Gatsby has smaller dreams of amassing …show more content…
Gatsby assumes that the only reason Daisy is not marrying him is because he was penniless but he fails to realize that there is a difference of classes between them. Daisy is from old money, meaning there is value to her name and she is married to a man who is also from old money. Gatsby is from new money, meaning though he is as rich as Daisy his money carries less value because his name carries no value. Even within the upper class there are differences and discrimination. When Tom and Gatsby are arguing over Daisy, Tom states: “…next they’ll throw everything overboard and have intermarriage between black and white” (Fitzgerald.124). Though Tom says black and white, he does not mean it in that way in the situation. He means to say anybody of his status or class being married to anyone below him, which includes Gatsby as he is from new money, is unworthy. During that same heated argument Tom gets upset and insults Gatsby, he says: “Certainly not for a common swindler who’d have to steal the ring he put on her finger” (Fitzgerald.127). Tom is saying that though Gatsby may have a lot of money, it is not worth as much as his in value. He is saying that Gatsby would not be able to afford and financially support Daisy as though Jay’s money is not real. Jay Gatsby spends five years making money

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