Fiasco The Iraq War Summary

Improved Essays
The beginning of the twenty first century has been marked with the same achievements and failures of the last one, great strides of technology to improve the quality of living, religious arguments over whose right, whose wrong, and humanities constant flow of self destruction. Specifically, conflicts in the Middle East leading to a terrorist age that may last for decades to come. Western incursions into countries like Iraq and Afghanistan have attributed to the terrorist attacks in recent years, where a majority of said attacks have been targeted to the U.S. and it’s constant involvement into the region. Thomas E. Ricks’s book Fiasco The American Military Adventure in Iraq gives an inside view of the American led military campaign into Iraq. …show more content…
Ricks’s book Fiasco The American Military Adventure in Iraq was published in 2006 after the Iraq War. Ricks, a senior Pentagon correspondent for The Washington Post and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist describes in detail the overall negative American involvement in the region. Ricks’s writings are filled with the incompetence of the Bush administrations urgency to go to war with Iraq. Claiming that the war began over a small source of international support and wrongful information about how Saddam Hussein and the terrorist group al Qaeda where somehow linked, with no information on weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). Decisions made by the Bush Administration, the Pentagon, the U.S. Central Command and American Military involved in the war, as well as civilians in Iraq showing the effect it had on them. Ricks book itself is divided into three different sections; Containment, Into Iraq and The Long Term. Part I, Containment delves deep into the events leading up to the U.S. eventually entering into Iraq because of the Gulf War in 1991, the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, and the “Silence of the Lambs” (page 85) where Congress put up little resistance to the war. Part II, Into Iraq, opens up with Ricks referring to the Iraq war plan as “perhaps the worst war plan in American History” (pages 115-116), how the U.S. was bungling through the war on misinformation, creating an insurgency, and the armies abuse of prisoners during the war. The last part of Ricks …show more content…
The war had gone on for over eight years almost a full decade, and in 2006 the study group was formed. The United States Congress charged the United States Institute of Peace to create The Iraq Study Group Report: The Way Forward – A new Approach. In the midst of the Iraq War, the report had two co-chairs James A. Baker III a senior government official who has served beneath three presidents, and Lee H. Hamilton another senior government official and member of the Committee on international Relations. Along with eight other member of the study group all from varying fields such as federal leaders, to cabinet leaders, professors and economists. The group began its first session March 15th, 2006 and ended in November 29th the same year. Along with taking a trip to Baghdad in the middle of the groups study where they met with American Military and Iraqi officials during the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Causing animosity between the Arabic news outlet and the Coalition forces who saw them as an aid to the Saddam Hussein. Al Jazeera opened its English language services in 2006 and shortly afterward their online services providing 24 hour news on the war. Claiming independence from its royal family ties, al Jazeera provided a comprehensive impartial view on the war that was not heard of by western media. Notably the differences between Al Jazeera and pro Bush administration media was the westerns battle coverage was censored of all bloodshed focusing instead on the heroic nature of the war, the exciting element such as weaponry and the military action itself. Whilst Al Jazeera on the other hand focused more extensively on issues such as diplomatic efforts, anti-war protests along with the graphic aftermath of the coalition’s bombing campaign by showing horrifying images of civilian casualties that were not present within the western media.…

    • 1260 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    That the United States under the Bush Administration was to eager to enter the war, and suffered at misinformation and lack of to justify the war. How according to the Iraq study group that now the United States was in Iraq they couldn’t just up and leave the country after turning it upside down without fear of retaliation. Each of these books are about the Iraq war and the United States involvement in great depth, each with its similarities and differences creating the picture of the Iraq we see today and how we could have changed…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Iraq War Analysis

    • 2281 Words
    • 10 Pages

    As a superpower, national interests and international influence are a great concern of U.S. Wars can be a tool to achieve goals. Afghanistan and The Iraq war were considered as these two strategic cards of U.S. The United States invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 was a response to 9/11 event – an action that was suspected by U.S is of terrorist group Al-Qaeda in order to prevent other security threat to U.S (BBC, 2016). Iraq war was launched in 2003 as a pre-emptive war because of the claim that Saddam Hussein government sponsored for terrorism and had weapons of mass destruction although there were no evidences (Benson, Brannen & Valentine, 2009). Besides victories such as: overthrowning Saddam Hussein and Taliban, eliminating Ossama Bin Laden…

    • 2281 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    On March 19th, 2003, President George W. Bush announces to the world that the United States military would soon be conducting operations in Iraq to free its people. Only two years after the biggest terrorist attack on America, Americans no longer felt safe. President Bush stormed through Iraq in search of the alleged nuclear weapons Saddam’s regime was said to have only to come up empty-handed. He also accused the Iraqi government of harboring and supporting al-Qaeda. The War on Terror was still fresh in American minds and citizens and soldiers alike felt that they were finally fighting for something.…

    • 1058 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He mention that the 9/11 act was the main issues for George W. Bush invasion in Iraq. Diplomats and the Bush Administration began to carry out a research to find out why 9/11 occurs and who the main leader was in such a dreadful act. Bush investigators and state officials found that Osama Bin Laden was a part of the attack since text messages and threats was send to his associates and our nation during the 9/11 attack. Thousands of women, men and children were killed during the attack. George W. Bush made it clear to his American people that for our nation to be at peace and safe, the people must fight.…

    • 1330 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In a broadcasted speech from Bush, he states that, “Iraq is a part of the war on terror. It’s a country that trains terrorists. It’s a country that could arm terrorists. Saddam Hussein and his weapons are a direct threat to this country.” He found a way to tricked the US citiziens into believing that Iraq was linked to 911 and that their country has weapon of mass distruction. “In the USA Today” article, it was stated that the United Nations didn’t find any.…

    • 856 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Instead of preemptively attacking a country in which, ‘Weapons of Mass Destruction’, was a pretext for war. The U.S. should have never gone to war with Iraq. For this reason, I read an article entitled: “What Would The World Be Like If We 'd Never Invaded Iraq?” I noticed that the author, Simon Childs, conveys a ‘matter of fact’ type of tone. For example, Mr. Childs stated, “Lawrence Wilkerson is a retired US Army colonel and former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell. Since his retirement, he 's gone rogue, lambasting many aspects of the Iraq war, including his own preparation of Powell 's presentation to the United Nations.…

    • 918 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Iraq War Realism

    • 1099 Words
    • 4 Pages

    After the ambush, there were claims that Saddam was providing military help to Al-Qaeda (The Weekly Standard, 2003). This had aggravated the need to go to war and increase security. During the war, US successfully removed the regime of Saddam and confirmed that there were no possession of WMDs were to be found. Critics may say that if WMDs were not found, why did US still go through to war? As a realist, the two most important things to the state would be security and power.…

    • 1099 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    That was the Americans initial fight, but the battle soon shifted to Iraq. In an interview President Bush said that he was lead to believe that Saddam Hussein possessed WMDs, or had access to them. President Bush was also told that he has seemed to have lost many Americans support in this war. He replied “I would hope they 'd want us to succeed before we get out of there. That 's a decision I had to make” and “I’ve sat down with lots of members from Congress, both parties, good decent people, who 've said, “start withdrawing now”.…

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Causes Of The War In Iraq

    • 1607 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The highlighted causes leading up to the war in Iraq that will be discussed are, September 11th, airport security, and the worlds view terrorism. The effects that will be highlighted and discussed are, American lives lost, countries debt increased, change in Iraqi Government, new terrorist cells, and America having the biggest…

    • 1607 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays