Feminist Ethnography Analysis

938 Words 4 Pages
In the Feminist Ethnography book, the authors have raised the question; If it possible for a feminist to be an ethnographer? And as a woman who considered herself a feminist I have faced some issues, with certain subjects. I understand that part of being an anthropologist (which I am not) is to try to understand certain things within its cultural context. However, most of the discussions we had in class were about issues and people who struggle to have “some” rights, or recognition within their societies. Therefore, I kept asking myself, when should “understanding” stop, and activism starts? In my opinion I do not think oppression should be “understood”. I do believe we have to understand the circumstances and the culture that led to certain …show more content…
They further tried to explain how what is now known as the third wave of feminism got its bad reputation, which included the fact that it addresses a wide range of issues “beyond” gender. So, what is wrong with supporting social issues, that is not gender-binary related? Is not freedom indivisible, as Nelson Mandela once said? If feminists’ goal is to end the marginalization of women, then it is only right to stand with all marginalized groups. Was not the issue with the second wave of feminism, that it was not inclusive? For me, it seems like there will be always “something wrong” with feminism. The question is; How do you define feminism? In my opinion, it is believing in women’s rights. That women and men are equal. And most importantly, the right for women to have the final say, over their bodies and their life decisions. And with this framework of active feminism. This definition should fit, different needs, in different communities. For example, an American feminist should fight against laws that prevent women from getting safe abortion. A Pakistani feminist should fight against genital mutilations. Acknowledging the differences in women’s needs is important, where is one issue would not be seen as less serious than the other, in its context of …show more content…
Therefor, I do not see why the term feminism should be changed to fit different needs. Why change the term to womanism or to any other term? People did not change the word democracy to make it more inclusive, even though it once meant for white males only. Moreover, when black women were not included in the white women movement at what is called the first wave, this did not prevent them from being feminists, and working for black women’s right. Women’s right movements does not need a name change, or “rebranding”. What feminism needs is the capability of criticize its past, and to be constantly evaluating its present. Also, it is important for feminism to stay relevant to women’s issues. And this is relevance can be maintained through a nonhierarchical structure for women’s activism. Which is what women are trying to do since the women’s liberation movement. Again, with sticking to another characteristic of feminism, where is the “Personal is Political”. However, in order for feminism to be more inclusive, what is “personal” should be a cross-culturally shared, and not limited to certain race or class or culture. All these qualities are essential to have a better understanding for women’s need for better conditions and equal

Related Documents