Feminist Criminology: The Second Wave Of Feminism

1658 Words 7 Pages
Part A The following essay is going to discuss the topic of feminist movement, specifically emphasizing on the topic of feminist criminology. Feminist criminology is the ongoing fight and battle that woman be granted the same rights as those of men, and that they be treated equally, which erupted in the 19th century. Women got tired of not receiving the same treatment and rights that were being granted to men. I believe that women are just as deserving of having the freedom and right to exercise their opinions by voting, posses the qualities making them capable of working, and have the knowledge and power to commit crimes, just as men do. Women should have a say in regards to who is in control of our country, be allowed to engage in activities …show more content…
It was devoted to greater social, political, and economic quality. The primary focus was the emancipation of women and liberal correctives involving the women 's role in society. The Second Wave of Feminism was a powerful, political and social movement that bettered the lives of women. This wave prolonged in the perspective of the anti-war and civil rights movements and the growing self-consciousness of a variety of minority groups around the world. Sexuality and reproductive rights were of large concern, making the biggest goal to include the passing of the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution. This would give everyone equality, regardless of ones gender. During the 1960 's era, lots of change took place. The Food and Drug Administration approved the very first oral contraceptive for women, making it available the following year. This was the first step in the liberation movement and now granted women to take control of their reproductive rights. As a result, the federal government amended the Equal Rights Act in 1963. President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 the following year. During this wave, women were encouraged to understand the aspects of their personal lives. The Equal Rights Act was amended in 1963 by the Federal Government, ensuring that men and women who worked in same work environment would not suffer wage discrimination …show more content…
The trauma that is associated with victimization is a direct reaction to the results of a crime. A victim is a someone who has suffered either from direct or threatened physical, emotional or financial harm, as a result of an act committed by another, which is a crime. There are many types of victimization. The common types or ones we hear about the most are sexual misconduct, rape, sexually touching, sexual harassment, stalking, assault/battery, domestic violence within relationships, theft, and the threat to cause harm. Crime victims may suffer great amounts of physical and psychological trauma as the result of being exposed to a crime. Victims may suffer primary injuries which have been grouped into the following distinct categories: physical, financial, and emotional. Victims may also suffer “secondary” injuries when they have not received the appropriate support or interventions, while coping with the aftermath of effects due to the crime. Physical injuries that a victim has received may be as visible as cuts, bruising, or broken bones. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon for victims to experience fatigue, lack of sleep, or to have an increase or decrease in their appetite. Many victims feel that the stress from victimization jeopardizes them to experience physical problems later on in

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