Feminism Is Over: Time To Move On, By Emily Hill

1225 Words 5 Pages
“Feminism is an interdisciplinary approach to issues of equality and equity based on gender, gender expression, gender identity, sex, and sexuality as understood through social theories and political activism” (Day, 2016). Feminism first came to light in 1840 when two brave women named Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton attended a World Anti-Slavery Convention (“Seneca Falls Convention Begins,” n.d.). During the convention, the two women were barred from the convention floor because of their sex. However, the issue did not stop the women from expressing their opinions and exercising their invisible rights. Mott and Stanton later on held a women’s conference in Seneca Falls, New York which is now known as the notorious Seneca Falls Convention. …show more content…
Time to Move on” by Emily Hill, she discusses that feminism is now a form of pointless attention-seeking rather than its main objective as a genuine crusade against genuine prejudice. “Attention-seeking” as defined in the article can be related to attacking women over crucial issues such as bikini waxing or wearing stilettos (Hill, 2015). Arguably, it may seem that women are less interested in making a change together socially but rather attack those who are their best allies. At this point, it can be considered that the idea of feminism defined by Hill is socially constructed. The socially constructed ideas used to define feminism is one of the many reasons that feminism has died in the United States and throughout the world. The idea of feminism as described in the beginning of this paper has lost all its meaning and does not mean the same as it did when Mott and Stanton held the Seneca Falls Convention. Therefore, many writers and media outlets may proclaim the feminism movement as dead because the main focal point is now misconstrued because of the socially constructed ideas placed on …show more content…
Varia further explains that women who are pregnant and fall below the production requirement are not be able to renew their contract after it ends, given very few breaks, forced overtime, and sexually harassed to increase production rates. The state of the workers in these developing countries go unseen because only 10% of domestic workers worldwide are employed in countries that extend them equal protection under national labor laws (Varia, 2016). The rest of the 90%, mostly women, fall into the category of the worker in the garment factory located in Cambodia. With the continuous growth in profits year over year because workers do not receive fair treatment or pay, the employers are able to retain large profits. Furthermore, most employees fear dismissal and unemployment; therefore, most do not protest or cause disruption against their

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