Feminism In Sweat, By Zora Neale Curston

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One of the most influential African American female writers in feminism was Zora Neale Hurston. During the Harlem Renaissance, she was well known because of her unique writing style and the topics she chose to write about. Hurston’s short story called “Sweat” informed readers on feminism and shows a different perspective on African American life which was significant to her and impacts other uninformed audiences. Hurston’s works on feminism and her unique perspective on African American culture still has influence on today’s society.
Feminism was one of the main topics that Hurston wanted society to be aware about. She wanted woman to be treated equally, which is still an ongoing battle that woman is fighting today. In many articles written
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She was raised to be independent due to her mother’s death at a young age and the absence of her father near the end of her childhood. Since Hurston was raise so independently she believed in the ideas of feminism. In her short story “Sweat” shows examples of feminism in her writing. “’Naw you won’t,’ she panted, ‘thaat ole snaggle-toothed black woman you runnin’ with aint comin’ heah to pile up on mah sweat and blood. You aint paid for nothin’ on this plae, and Ah’m gointer stay right heah til Ah’m toted out foot foremost’” (2, Hurston). Hurston wrote the protagonist, Delia as a black woman that would not put up with other people difficulties even if he was her husband. She wrote Delia to show woman that they can be independent as well and to stand up for themselves. Another example of self-empowerment and feminism is in her play “Color Struck”. They play is about the “She creates a world of black southern folklore through her protagonist, Emma, who is rejected both by mainstream society and by her own community” (Krasner). Southern African American woman “… were allegedly unfit to represent the “new woman,” fully self-sufficient and modern” …show more content…
It did not stop people from seeing Hurston’s message of self-empowering woman. Claire Crabtree said, “Critics have largely neglected or misunderstood Hurston’s conscious use of traditional or “folk” material in the novel” (Crabtree, 54-55). Once you understand her writing style then you can understand the meaning behind her African American folk

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