Feminism In Nordic Noir

812 Words 4 Pages
With the 1990s noir heroines, the female protagonists experienced another cultural change in gender roles. The 1990s noir more angry female protagonist rose to the surface while third-wave feminism was impending, and as discussed before, following up as a kind of critique to the second-wave. The third phase of feminism destabilized the earlier constructs, and an appealing sexuality while also being self-reliant and clever, was not considered to identify with male oppression (Genz & Brabo, 2009, p. 11). The noir films of the late 1990s and its heroines started to fundamentally undermine the institutions of the “supremacist capitalist patriarchy.” With this, social imagination was rather productively depicted. A familiar topic, the noir genre, …show more content…
99). In classic cinema, there was a man for every female character. Not just in classic film noir but also in other genres. This is something that is arguably also still visible in contemporary media. The 1990s noir women however challenged these established foundations in order to give voice to undermining the patriarchy, which is a concept that is also apparent in Nordic Noir, but the Scandinavian crime genre portrays a certain verisimilitude in regards to women as part of a so-called ‘man’s world.’ These series, like The Killing, convey the idea that a notion such as a patriarchy no longer exists and that true gender equality has been realised. Even though Scandinavia’s gender equality is worthy, it might in reality not be at the same level as the genre portrays – and when taking its international audiences into account, this realistic gender equality may seem even less of a true …show more content…
65). Hence, the continuum connection of public epochs and the thematic gender politics they express on screen are also commented upon in Nordic Noir but are evidently revised. Scandinavia has a long tradition of government intervention to promote social equality, which may have made the public more receptive to ideas of achieving equality for women in public life (Karvonen & Selle, 1995). Traditional attitudes toward gender equality could be regarded as an important determinant of generating a worldview on screen. This implies therefore that contemporary Nordic Noir reflects its gender roles with a similar approach as film noir, although developed. The female desire for freedom, wealth and independence is for example no longer portrayed like a narcissistic character trait or a fantasy, but as something that is well established in society. Contemporary Nordic Noir seems to portray a worldview where gender equality has been fully integrated and women occupy all different important roles in public life. In both The Killing and The Bridge women are lawyers, CEO’s, have political careers, and are depicted with different identities. The limitations that are suggested in classic film noir are acknowledged, but no longer relevant and might even be suggested to be

Related Documents