Feminism In Alice Munro

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“Feminism isn’t about making women stronger. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength.” - G.D. Anderson Many years ago, one common practice in many countries was to deny women’s rights. Women were being oppressed and considered inferior to men. They did not have the right to vote because they were considered to have inferior minds. They were only required to stay at home to do house chores and to take care of the children while the male was working outside. Consequently, all of these ended through continuous activism to fight for the rights they deserve. In short, they fought for equality among men and women to end sexism and gender discrimination. The rights these people fought for in the past …show more content…
By diverting the attention of the readers from the reality that they are familiar with to the reality that the characters know and understand, the author puts emphasis on feminism. When the author merges an incredible idea with the reality, the readers are able to think what reality is and how they can recognize and appreciate, in a better way, the world they live in. Jones explains that “the main characters in Alice Munro's mesmerizing stories, mostly women, are an unprepossessing lot: librarians, eccentric spinsters, seamstresses, all of them denizens of small, drab, Canadian towns. But invariably, Munro pulls a switch, something like that old movie cliche where the mousy heroine removes her glasses, undoes her hair and reveals herself a beauty” (63). When the author focuses the stories on the change in self-perception of women, she is able to depict feministic views that fascinate her readers (Jones, …show more content…
When the characters in the stories are going through the introduction of their lives, they are confronted with troubles and challenges when it comes to marriage and death. There are also times when the characters think about quitting because it may seem as the easiest way out. Despite the daily dilemmas in their lives, through perseverance and determination, the author was able to evolve her characters into fine, self-assured and triumphant individuals. Kustec is able to show how the theme of survival is essential to Munro’s stories. Kustec said that “before Munro’s characters achieve the goals to which their effort or ambition has been directed to, they usually have to suffer, for they live their lives simply, directly and often painfully.” This statement means that the author’s characters experience suffering at all times because that is purposively the life that they are supposed to live. If the characters will not suffer in the stories, the enlightenment and transformation that they experienced at the finale of the stories will not be as compelling and convincing as the author wants them to be (Kustec,

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