What Should I Consider Myself A Feminist?

1041 Words 5 Pages
Feminism is becoming one of humanity’s many pillars in terms of the modern-world. There are protests, commercials, rallies, and groups all supporting the rights of the female gender and what it means to be a woman. These “suffragettes” concentrate their labors and energy on issues such as inequality, the wage-gap, rape and sexual assault, domestic violence, and other matters that pose a threat to a woman’s dignity. Readers should not construe the complete outlook posed from a feminist 's perspective because I do not consider myself a feminist. Nonetheless, I hope that what I say will trickle into the lives of women who feel weak, as though they are disregarded, women who want to speak up, and women who have fallen victim to the misogynistic …show more content…
Women no longer feel they have to stand aside and permit men to govern the social order in human civilization. However, I believe there is another issue at hand that the feminists should truly shine their focuses on. Many women are unheard, not just in professional environments, but personal as well. There is a communal stereotype that women are more social and emotional than men. Deriving from this exists a social hierarchy that reigns for all the wrong reasons. The general population (including some women,) classifies women as “wordy” in correlation with the assumed impression that females are “more emotional,” insisting that emotion dictates the average woman’s judgment. If this common belief endures: that women are “emotional” beings while men are the “logical” ones, it will be simply effortless for women to just go on living half-lives in the shadow of men. With hindsight, men are just as sociable and emotional as women; some are just better at masking their …show more content…
It is not just a doctrine in the focal points of feminism, but has played a part in the name of science as well. Researchers, statistic builders, and data collectors have set up studies that disprove this predominant fallacy. According to some, “Women have long been assumed the more talkative sex, but some studies indicate that men may be the bigger talkers while others found no difference between the sexes” (Duberman, 2014). Professor Jukka-Pekka Onnela (now a professor at Harvard) led a study through Northeaster University with fellow researchers on speaking behavior. Wanting to track the data and provide evidence of the scientists’ findings, each participant of the social exercise knowingly wore a sociometer, an apparatus that “tracked speech and gauged proximity to others” (Duberman, 2014). “Context makes such a big difference” according to leading-scientist in the matter, Onnela (Roeder, 2014). Following analyzation of the data and results, it had been concluded that when there “was no task to complete or particular incentive to talk, there were no ‘gender-based differences’ in talkativeness” (Duberman,

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