Analysis Of Betty Friedan´s The Feminine Mystique

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Feminists and scholars have divided the feminist movement 's history into three "waves". The first wave refers mostly to the women 's suffrage movements of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The second wave contains the ideas and actions associated with the women 's liberation movement beginning in the 1960s, campaigning for legal and social rights for women. The third wave consists of the reactions and results of the second wave’s ideas beginning in the 1990s. Although the terms "feminism" and "feminist" did not gain widespread use until the 1970s, they were already being used in the everyday language much earlier. As a result of these three waves, women today are flourishing in ways never before possible and inch closer and closer …show more content…
Published in 1963, during the early years of the Second Wave, The Feminine Mystique has been referred to as the most important text of the women’s liberation movement. This “feminine mystique” she describes can be defined as the idea that women should be content with devoting their lives to being perfect wives and mothers. Beginning with “the problem that has no name” referring to the popular unhappiness of women in the 1950s-1960s and the lives they were living despite their comfortable lives. The book goes on to discuss the personal issues these women were feelings and many statistics of the history of these issues. She provides studies who have gone against the feminine mystique and her ideas of how other women can do the same. Friedan’s book created social uproar that has yet to be matched since. The frustrations of these women that were previously unknown and, more specifically, unacceptable were now recognized to the public and influenced the many forms of legislation passed in favor of women in the following years. Futurist Alvin Toffler describes the movement Friedan inspired to have “pulled the trigger on history.” Friedan went on to found the National Organization for Women (mentioned above) and propose ideas still discussed today …show more content…
The efforts made everyday by Women’s Rights groups are too huge to even skim the surface in a single essay. Damousi discusses women’s future for education and other possible challenges they may face in the twenty-first century. We live in a world referred to as “Post-feminism” in which men and women live and react to the actions taken in all three waves. It is no secret that gender equality has not yet been achieved, expressed by the wage-gap and even the current election which has nearly turned into a Battle of the Sexes. Feminism has been adapting to the fast-changing society for nearly 200 years, and the three waves have set the standards for the future of women in America

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