Federalists And The Constitution: The Interpretation Of The United States

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The United States government was created to have three equal branches, the judicial, executive, and legislative and was helped by the writing of the Constitution by James Madison. Even with these practices established, many Presidents and the government have decided and shaped United States politics by how they interpret and analyze the Constitution. Over the course of United States history all of the different political parties that arise read the Constitution in different ways and believe the meaning to certain parts of the Constitution are different. These conflicts have also caused many power struggles to arise between the President and Congress, typically when the two sides disagree and are controlled by different political parties, resulting …show more content…
The two early political groups of the United States, the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans both had very different agendas when in came to politics and the reading of the Constitution. One of the first conflicts that arose between the Federalists and Democratic-Republican parties because of a disagreement over the interpretation of the Constitution was the First Bank of the United States. The Federalists were for the First Bank of the United States and favored a looser interpretation of the Constitution while the Democratic-Republicans opposed the First Bank of the United States because they favored a strict interpretation of the Constitution and did not believe it gave Congress the right to establish a national bank. This conflict continued through the presidency of Andrew Jackson who strongly opposed a central bank for the United States and favored people putting money in smaller, local banks (pet banks) while the Whigs opposed Andrew Jackson’s Democratic views on the central …show more content…
Andrew Johnson’s presidency was dictated completely by Congress. Andrew Johnson had disagreements with Congress over how to go about reconstruction after the Civil War which led to almost all of his vetoes being overridden and him almost being impeached, which gave all of the power in the government during Johnson’s presidency to Congress. Harry S. Truman also struggled with his powers because of Congress because of Congress’s opposition towards Truman’s ideas, because of both he House of Representative and Senate being controlled by the Republican party and Truman was a Democrat. Truman labeled this Congress the “Do Nothing Congress”, which contributed to him being reelected because it convinced the American people that the reason he was unable to accomplish much as president was because of Congress Republicans abusing the majority they held in Congress. The President of the United States has more power over the Congress in times of war. President McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard Nixon all sent troops into foreign nations without approval from Congress. Richard Nixon’s presidency is a time in when the executive branch held much more power than Congress. Nixon controlled the spending of the country, a right the Constitution

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