Federalism In The Constitution

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Federalism as we know it today, is a complex and dynamic method of government that divides power between a national government and smaller governmental units. In the United States, the smaller governmental units represent the state/local governments. The United States first started out as a confederation of thirteen states and eventually established a successful federal system. The Founders of this country identified several reasons for creating a federalist government: To evade tyrannical rule and to allow more participation in politics. The key to success of a federal government system is supported through the idea of democracy. Both levels of government have the power to create laws, however, they must abide by the rules of the Constitution. …show more content…
The Articles of Confederation was the first Constitution of the United States and was adopted in 1777 and ratified in 1781. The Articles formed a loosely bounded confederation of sovereign states and a very weak central government (The Library of Congress, 2015). Some weaknesses the articles portrayed were that Congress could not regulate trade, there was no uniform system of currency, regulation of commerce, no power of taxation, no national military, no power to enforce laws, and much more (Brackemyre, 2015). During this time period in American history, the states had much more power than the national government. These issues that the Articles portrayed eventually led to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 for the establishment of a new and powerful governing entity. The Constitution was created and is the system of federalism …show more content…
The Stock Markey Crash of 1929 was the most devastating economic turmoil that the United States ever faced. By 1933, more than one third of America’s population was unemployed, more than half of the country’s banks failed, hundreds of businesses were lost, and poverty became the norm (History.com Staff, The Great Depression, 2009). As a response, President Roosevelt put the New Deal into effect. The New Deal was a series of governmental relief programs to battle the depression. The New Deal allowed increased regulation of banking, commerce, and the Stock Market. It also created programs such as Social Security. In order to enforce and carry out these programs, the national government had to grow and increase its power, thus taking powers away from the

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