Fear Of Missing Out Analysis

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While I have gained so much knowledge about the fear of missing out and how Denison students discuss and work to avoid this phenomenon, we still encounter this on a large basis, and I have worked to reframe my overall research question to ask how Denison students discuss and work to avoid the fear of missing out through extensive interaction? Furthermore, how do the differences in our definitions and interpretations of FOMO implicate our relationships with others? My experiential observations and interpretations are rooted in the texts that we have read and discussed throughout the semester, even when the fear of missing out is not closely discussed in any of them. My research offers a unique perspective on different ideas that these scholars …show more content…
I define fear, as discussed in the terms of the fear of missing out, as the unpleasant emotion brought about by encountering the empty space that exists between ourselves and others. The suggestion of FOMO as being a part of some form of empty “space” includes interactions between people, both with and without the internet, or forms of social media. Tuan (1979), discussing landscapes of fears, suggests that “intensity and frequency of fear differ greatly among species” (p. 4). This idea of fear does not just apply for different species, but different individuals as well. In my cooperative inquiry where we embodied FOMO, the experiences of the phenomenon were all different, and communicated to me differently as well. Two participants were away from Denison’s campus, and found it easier to stay logged out of Snapchat, while the other two participants (one of them being me) had more trouble staying logged out of the application. The two who were off campus said they did not encounter as much FOMO because they were having fun off campus, and one agreed that if she was on campus, she would have felt more FOMO. Tuan …show more content…
This interpretation suggests that by doing this, we are missing out on interpersonal connections and we do not have time to interact in-person anymore. The idea that we do not have time anymore comments on the interpretation of fear by Svendsen (2007) that it is a “byproduct of luxury” (p. 20). As Denison students, we have the luxury of choosing where and when to spend our time, but as the school is small, one participant noted that we are so busy (especially as first semester seniors) and we have to balance our time to make sure we are having in-person interactions with friends. The luxury comes into the equation when we have so many choices about how to spend our time, and we fear that we are missing out on things based on our luxury of choice. Our luxury of choice comes with entitlement to always being in touch with people through technology, and we then think about the fear of missing out more than we need to be thinking about

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