Violence Exposed In Bigger's Native Son

Better Essays
Bigger Thomas is intended to be the embodiment of the vicious prejudice cycle seen in America during his time period. His whole life is essentially the constant cycle of hate, but only fit into one lifetime. His raw and animalistic fear at what the whites will do to him if he lashed out then causes him to lash out, and be portrayed as violent, which then causes a torrent of racial divide, and just as peace and understanding are being uncovered, they become cut short by ignorance. His life beings in fear and violence that is repeatedly lashed at him, like a whip, and he eventually uses violence to break the hatred, until he realizes that this flood of pride from breaking the prejudice only causes more violence, and is slowly introduced to the …show more content…
Bigger’s thoughts are initially fairly simple and drawn out, yet he gives us glimpses of his fear and realization of the racial injustice system, but quickly hides them behind thoughts of violence or other relief actions like drinking or playing pool instead of finding a job. As his confusion and anxiety mount, they culminate in the murder of Mary, after which Bigger’s sentences start to sound like realizations. Each explanation of his actions fuels Bigger’s confidence, and we can feel his understanding of the situation around him pulsing underneath his words, wanting to break free. We feel sympathy for Bigger as his feelings, raw emotions of lust and hate, start to connect with the words of Max and help reveal how the complex system of racial injustice has bred someone like Bigger. It is also extremely important to note that ironically, Bigger uses his knowledge of how white people think of him to his advantage. He deliberately twists his speech and manner in order to cater to their racist assumptions, and yet he doesn’t realize that the whole purpose of his murder was a subconscious attempt to break those assumptions. The book is also divided into three sections, Fear, Flight, and Fate, which reveal Bigger’s mental state during each section. The first sections shows how fear has developed Bigger’s internal thought process, and how …show more content…
If one is raised in a society that does not let them think or act for themselves, then what will they think of themselves? Self-hate blossoms into hate of the system, and hate always results in violence. The particular difficulty of breaking the cycle in America was that the people of color always felt fear and shame, from the time they were young. Wright demonstrates with the rat and the naked children watching their parents, that this shame can turn someone into a violent beast, where violence seems like the only fuel for power. Wright also demonstrates how rich the 1930s were for the seeds of fascism, everyone hungry for their taste of power and uprising by having Bigger be slightly jealous of the dictators and their ability to rule these people with total power. These dictators preyed upon that fear and shame of the people they sought to rule over, much like how a semi-crazed Bigger seeks to rule his people and take advantage of them through fear and shame. He also uses it against the white people, capitalizing on their fear of offending Bigger and their shame of having to ask him for help in order to escape from conviction. Wright demonstrates how those two core emotions, so easily inflamed, can lead to a nonstop cycle of reactionary hate and violence that would become American racial

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Fear. It propels many thoughts and actions, especially in Shakespeare’s, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. As the senators fear Caesar and his ever growing power, they conspire to bring him down. Partly because of fear, yet also motivated by personal motives and jealousy, they murder Caesar in cold blood. This fear of his ambition, partnered with conspiracy, cause much harm to many people.…

    • 1030 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    His conflict in not being able to overlook this matter leads him to oversee the larger picture of oppression that him and his people face. On one occasion, Bigger’s fear of this image leads him to kill a white woman and steal the…

    • 1235 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Causes Of Fascism

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Communist new ideoligist plans started outgrowing fascism that has caused a psychology of hatred. The dictator, Hitler, has risen through fascism. He wanted to control the economy and build a military for was against other countries. Because of him this caused distruction. He had many crazy ideas, even now days his ideas are still here.…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Racism is a major factor that plays a significant role in the novel, which helps to make Bigger understand the circumstances of racial crimes and how they create an influence towards him. For example, in the part where Bigger attempts to rob a white man, his group is too frightened to go with him. Bigger says, “You scared of going with me,” implies that the group is unaware of Bigger’s plan and therefore they want to disobey him. The attitude behind Bigger is not convivial, but rather hatred. My feedback towards the entire novel would be breathtaking and great story.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Was Hitler Good Or Bad

    • 1186 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Hitler, desiring to reach the norms set by society was a victim of society. It is evident that Hitler committed a multitude of heinous actions, however, Hitler, like many was once a kind, pure person who simply experienced too many negative events which influenced his mindset, transforming the kindness into jealousy and eventual hatred, desiring to void his anger through the persecution of the Jewish people. Hitler was truly born into the wrong time, he was exposed to corruption very early into his life, in addition the societal norm during the era he was born into was incredulously high due to the desire of Germany to emerge as a world power. Human nature at heart is good, but due to the high standards society sets, humans become corrupt. Hitler was corrupted by this high standard and blamed the Jewish people for his failures in life, his true hatred derived from jealousy and society.…

    • 1186 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Everyday we hear on the news how people are at war and killing people, and this just makes us create these awful stereotypes that then soon build and make us then attack the “mockingbirds in our life. The problem now is that there is so much hate and racism in our world and instead of fixing it, we brush it under the rug and just like anything that you let sit, it gets worse. Then when we hit the point that we can not brush off anymore, we direct all the things that have been getting worse and building up towards the people who not causing anyone harm. We are sinning because of this killing. Reading this book makes you side with Boo and Tom, we are all on their side, but then when we stop reading and step back into the real world, we attack the Toms and Boos in life.…

    • 1369 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Stanley’s vicious nature is caused by his own vulnerability which is resolved with such brute force; he is aggressive towards Blanche and everyone else who defies or intimidates him. Using Stanley’s character, Williams reveals that this primal instinct is originated by a sense of inferiority, thus humanizing these monster-like, violent types of men to assist those under such men to understand and adapt to them. Stanley’s savage, animal like description and tendency of relying on brute force to solve his problems reveals that deep down he feels inferior and threatened by others. Stanley has been feeling inferior, that there is proof of, since he met Stella, “STANLEY: When we first met, me and you, you thought I was common. How right you was, baby.…

    • 1508 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This basically forced the german people to comply with the Nazi party because if they didn 't they would become a victim like the Jews. It got so bad that the german people lived their lives in fear. They had no choice but to follow Hitler so they could survive (Persuasion of Hitler 2-3). Hitler showed his ruthlessness in war. He waged war on multiple countries which also frightened man german…

    • 1163 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Whether those injustices are as important as police brutality or as simple as injustices like no dessert for Riley as presented in Inside Out. Evidence: However, in Lord of The Flies, anger drives Jack to go to extremes in order to prove his superiority against Ralph. Jack’s anger leads him to belittle poor piggy to appear as a strong authority figure to the other boys. Ultimately, this anger drives him to not only participate in Simon’s murder but also the attempted murder of…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Raskolnikov, from the beginning of the narrative, struggles with committing the murders, feeling physically ill because of what he feels he has to do. But this stumbling block does not stop him, as he still murders the two women. Raskolnikov’s disgust with himself in the beginning of the novel is a manifestation of the guilt he feels. “The feeling of intense repulsion, which had began to oppress and torture his heart while he was on his way to the old woman, had by now reached such a pitch and had taken such a definite form that he did not know what to do with himself to escape from his wretchedness.” (Dostoevsky 11). This repulsion before he actually commits the murder shows how even before he executes the crime he feels the guilt of his actions.…

    • 1389 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays