Fear And Intimidation In Lord Of The Flies

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“May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won't." This quote by George S Patton clearly displays the feelings of the American public during such an adverse time as World War II. The characters in Lord of the Flies by William Golding, possess these feelings as well. Throughout the novel, there are very clear parallels which connect the boys and events found in the novel to the people which endured the tragedy of WWII. The elements of fear and intimidation have a large impact on the various characters of the novel Lord of the Flies By William Golding, just as coercion and terror had a heavy role in the lives of those living in the Axis Powers during WWII.
Planes whirring overhead, glass breaking and sounds of metal bending coming from all
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As panic reached the island, the boys gave into Jack out of pure fear of what he would do if they resisted. The cause for the schism is Jack’s desire for revenge and control, much like Hitler. This can be seen in quotes such as, "Jack! Jack! You haven't got the conch! Let him speak."Jack's face swam near him. "And you shut up! Who are you, anyway? Sitting there - telling people what to do. You can't hunt, you can't sing -" "I'm chief. I was chosen." (Golding 98). This shows that Jack felt that he could undermine Ralph’s authority and do whatever he pleases. Jack places fear in the hearts of the boys by constantly asserting his control. This is seen in quotes such as, "I painted my face—I stole up. Now you eat—all of you—and I—" (Golding 97). Also, in Chapter 8 Jack uses terror to control the boys, and remind them he is in charge. He does this by tying up Wilfred and beating him for no clear reason. His desire for power creates chaos. Once Jack decides that he is leaving to start his own tribe, the others quickly follow. This is due to the amount of dread they feel as to what might happen if they don’t do exactly what Jack requests. This can be seen when Samneric are too afraid to speak up against Jack, even to save the life of their dear friend

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