Fdr New Deal Essay

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On October 29, 1929, on a day know as “black tuesday”, the Start Market Crashed resulting in one of the most terrifying events in American history, the Great Depression. At this time “banks failed, the nation 's money supply diminished, companies went bankrupt, and workers were being fired in packs”. When FDR became president in 1933 he tried to “stabilize the economy” and “provide jobs to those who were suffering”. To do this FDR instituted “a series of experimental projects known as the New Deal”. The New deal would stay in progress over the next 8 years, aiming to restore “dignity and prosperity” to Americans (History.com staff). Although FDR’s New Deal brought relief to the people and reformed our government, it failed to end the Depression …show more content…
Roosevelt’s new laws about social security, minimum wage, labour relations and trade unions survived”. The laws were successful in “protecting ordinary people’s rights and conditions” and unlike some European countries, “democracy survived in America” (How successful was the New Deal?). The New Deal became a model of how a Democratic government has to behave. The Securities and Exchange Commision helped reform the economy by permanently “monitoring stock market activity and ensure that no fraud or insider trading was taking place” (How did Roosevelt New Deal). Some of the programs FDR created are still with us today like the Social Security Act. The Social Security Act “guaranteed pensions to millions of Americans, set up a system of unemployment insurance” and specified that “the federal government would help care for dependent children and the disabled” (History.com staff). Roosevelt was loved by the people and was elected for 4 terms until his death. His New Deal and the programs created proved successful in providing relief and reform to the diminished American …show more content…
Republicans claim “that Roosevelt was behaving like a dictator” and they thought he “was making the government too powerful”. They also believed “FDR was destroying the American way of life”, claiming his Social Security Act “would make Americans lazy and dependent on government help”. The New Deal was “taking high taxes from the wealthy Americans” and this angered the Republicans because they believe that they “were wealthy because they had worked hard” for their money. The businessmen were “angry at trade unions, at the idea of minimum wages, and a group of wealthy businessmen formed the Liberty League to oppose the New Deal”. The Liberty League was “founded to defend the Constitution and defend the rights and liberties guaranteed by that Constitution” (Who attacked the New Deal). These businessmen accused Roosevelt for “betraying his class”. The supreme Court went against Roosevelt and “ruled that some of his programs were illegal because they took away the State 's’ powers”. The Supreme court ended up “reversing their decisions” after Roosevelt threatened to “force old Supreme Court judges to retire and to create new ones”. Finally the State Governments “opposed the New Deal, saying that the Federal government was taking their powers” (How successful was the New Deal?). The amount of opposition against the New Deal proves it was not a complete

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