What´s The Fatimid Caliphate?

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The Fatimid Caliphate (ad-Dawlah al-Fāṭimiyya) was an Ismaili Shia Caliphate, it lasted from the year 909 to the year 1171 and eventually fell when its last Caliph (Al Athid or Abū Muḥammad ʿAbd Allāh ibn Yūsuf ibn al-Ḥāfiẓ) died, making place for the Ayyubid Sultanate of Egypt and Syria under Saladin. The Fatimid Caliphate was the only Shi’a Caliphate, it was tied to the Ismaili branch of Shi’a Islam, the belief is centered around Isma’il, the son of Ja’Far As-Sadid, the sixth Imam and seventh Imam, they are a Shi’a minority group. The distinction lies in the succession among the Imams, majority of Shi’a believe the succession of Ja’Far As Sadid went to Musa as Isma’il was stripped from succession due to being found in state of intoxication, …show more content…
At the conception of Ismaili theology, the sect had more in common with the traditional Shi’a branches of Islam, however they underwent changes as time came on, these changes helped improve their position on the web. The Ismaili Theology lends thoughts from philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle, and share some of their Hellenistic views, thus freedom of thought and reason (it can be argued that Ismaili were closer to agnosticism than Islam) was an intricate part of their rule and greatly benefited literature and philosophy. However this is also claimed to not be in line with what Islam stands for and was a source of conflict with other sects of Islam, arguably with a certain intent. Contrary to other sects of Islam, the Fatimid rulers were involved with scholars and motivated research, created libraries and promoted scholars to higher positions, this is without a doubt a direct consequence of their adoption of Aristotelian beliefs which are square against Orthodox Islam and went as far as too criticize the Quran for being for the unlearned. As a consequence the capital, Cairo, underwent fast progress and developed their diplomatic and religious ties all the way to India, trade …show more content…
As such the union of several bodies only helps internal communication, improves internal trade relations and allows for works to be united under the same language. This goes together with the usage of one single currency, thus economic boosts are self explanatory and yet again are a basis for the vertical growth of the human web within an empire. Far reaching trade relations expanded the human web horizontally; thus the Fatimid Caliphate improved its standing in the human web, through passive and aggressive religious conversion, military conquest and a very open-minded society that promoted and motivated free thinking, research and dialogue. When the Caliphate declined and ultimately fell, it gave rise to the Ayyubid Sultanate which proceeded to further expand in West

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