Father And Son Relationships In Arthur Miller's Death Of A Salesman

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Register to read the introduction… It could be stated that Willy has smothered his sons with love. Willy is determined to have a large impact on his sons’ lives because his father had little impact on his. (Carson pg. 89) The constant support as children has molded the Lomans into men who always flee back to their home whenever trouble arises. Biff says “I never got anywhere because you blew me so full of hot air I could never stand taking orders from anybody!” (Miller pg. 105) Willy has tried so hard in his life to be the perfect father, yet his sons do not appreciate all that he does for them. The only way he can understand this is by claiming that his sons have been spiting him. (Miller pg. …show more content…
Willy felt that it was weak enough to warrant him committing suicide. A major problem is that the father/son relationship is bedeviled by guilt. (Bigsby pg. 126) The earliest incident of guilt affecting the relationship is when Biff walks in on Willy and his mistress in Boston. Willy feels guilty for his sin and spends the rest of his life trying to make it up to Biff. (Centola pg. 31) Willy was always the man who knew everything and could do no wrong. Biff immediately lost trust for his father and was heartbroken when he witnessed that his father is not as perfect as he thought. No relationship can be considered functional without trust from all parties involved. Willy feels guilty for his sons’ lack of success. (Centola pg. 31) He knows that he has not raised them to be the best they could be, but he does not want to admit it. He also feels guilty about exaggerating his own accomplishments and encouraging his sons to disregard the law. (Carson pg. 88) Nothing good has come from embellishing success and breaking the law. Biff feels just as guilty because he knows he will never be able to redeem Willy’s meaningless life. (Bigsby pg. …show more content…
Willy tried so hard for such a long time to be the perfect father but did not have much success. Willy’s failure to come to terms with his own father cripples him in his ability to be a father in his turn. (Carson pg. 92) Once Willy knows that he has his sons’ love, he is immediately over whelmed. He commits suicide to make sure he never loses his sons’ love and to help them. Willy’s definition of success also leads to the suicide because he believes that insurance money will help make Biff and Happy successful. Willy’s quick exit leaves the Linda, Biff, and Happy forever

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