Fate And Destiny In Charles Dickens's A Tale Of Two Cities

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As stated by Napoleon Bonaparte, “there is no such thing as accident; it is fate misnamed”. Since the 16th century, it was believed among historical figures that each individual controls their own destiny through their actions. The novel of Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, written in 1859, famously depicts the story of loss and love during the French Revolution in 1789. Throughout the novel, Dickens uses many characters and symbols to develop of theme of fate and destiny. Symbols such as the broken wine cask and constant knitting function to foreshadow the fates of many characters and conflicts. A character analysis of a protagonist, Sydney Carton, also reveals that his ultimate Christ-like sacrifice was destined in the early chapters …show more content…
For example, as Lucie and Mr. Lorry venture through the impoverished streets of Paris to find Dr. Manette, who was initially presumed dead, Lucie and Mr. Lorry witness a wine cask spill on the streets. Dickens illustrates that “it [the wine cask] had stained many hands, too, and many faces, and many naked feet, and many wooden shoes. The hands of the man who sawed the wood, left red marks on the billets…” (28). While Dickens is clearly pointing out the French citizens’ famine by fighting for the pool of wine, he hints at their desire for justice. Fate turns this depiction into reality when the French revolutionists overthrow the aristocratic class of Paris and shed blood on the same streets. After recalling Dr. Manette to life, Lucie and Dr. Manette successfully help acquit Darnay in his case for suspicion of treason against England. After Carton and Darnay introduced themselves to the Manette family, they, along with Mr. Lorry, gathered at the Manette home in Soho. There, Lucie and company listen to the rain and hear echoes of footsteps from afar. Lucie imagines that the echoing footsteps “are coming by-and-bye into our lives” (99). The echoes of the footsteps are later revealed to symbolize the marches of French revolutionists fighting in Bastille. Through fate, this imagination is comprehended when Lucie conflicts with French revolutionists and their desire to execute Darnay, …show more content…
Manette, Darnay, and Carton from their respective imprisonments. Firstly, Dr. Manette rushes to France and announces Darnay’s imprisonment to Mr. Lorry at Tellson’s Bank. Dr. Manette tells Mr. Lorry of the promise he made: “I knew I could help Charles out of all danger; I told Lucie so” (253). Despite his promise to free Darnay at all costs, Dr. Manette’s forgotten denouncement of Darnay reappears. This event served two functions: to provide Carton the change in fate to sacrifice himself for Lucie’s loved one, and “otherwise restored” (364) Dr. Manette from his fixation of cobbling shoes. Secondly, Darnay was concerned for the state of Gabelle and felt compelled to rescue him after he received his letter asking for Marquis St. Evrémonde’s presence in France. Dickens states that “...the winds and streams had driven him [Darnay] within the influence of the Loadstone Rock, and it was drawing him to itself [Paris], and he must go” (234). Darnay’s attachment to France was finally diminished after Carton fulfilled his fate of sacrificing himself. Only after this tragedy did Darnay permanently settle in England. Lastly, Carton, in his final moments before the guillotine, contemplates the future and what this sacrifice will bring unto him. He thinks to himself, “I see a child who lay upon her [Lucie’s] bosom and who bore my name, a man whining his way up in that path of life which once was mine. I see him

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