Family Traits In Our Time By John Edgar Wideman

1964 Words 8 Pages
Register to read the introduction… I myself am the youngest in my family I have one older sister. Amanda is 20 years old and a junior in college. To say she makes my parents proud is an understatement she was accepted to Hofstra University’s Honors College and has a 3.9 GPA. From an early age teachers always said “Look here I have Amanda’s little sister in class” and on almost every report card it would say not as the same level as Amanda. All through elementary school I struggled a lot with math and school in general. So instead of focusing on school like my sister, I turned to sports. Every season I was running from soccer, to basketball, to swim team, and then to lacrosse. I had chosen a different path, which was hard for my family to accept. But it has made me the person I am …show more content…
“But what that heart is and where it is I can’t say. I can’t depend on it, so he shouldn’t. Part of me goes out to him. Heartbreak is the sound of ice cracking. Deep. Layers and layers muffling the sound (Wideman 687).” He knows that there were warning signs but instead of stepping in and helping his youngest sibling he went about living his own day-to-day life. “Try to understand where I been. Why I did what I did. You got time for that in here. Time’s all you got in here” (Wideman 682). We will never know what Robby’s life would have become and he spends hours depicting what his full potential could have been. John becomes absorbed in the guilt he feels and wonders where he could have helped Robby. John’s guilt is helping him to get a better understanding of his brother, that understanding comes a better family …show more content…
“Maybe they are foreground and background, propping each other up (Wideman 688).” John needed Robby and Robby needed John to piece together the story and now that they’ve done that John feels pressure. In their family everyone was entitled to their privacy and no one pried. Having Robby share so much personal, detailed information made John emotional. “I was banging on the door of his privacy. I believed I’d shed some of my own” (Wideman 676). They were not accustomed to sharing but they worked through their hesitation and began to build a closer

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