Fall Of The Han And Roman Empire

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Two prosperous empires that exceeded in developing trade, creating new inventions, and leaving a legacy behind collapsed. How could such a prosperous empire fall? The western Roman empire and the Han dynasty both collapsed during the classical era for similar and contrasting reasons. The fall of both empires occurred due to internal pressures like epidemic diseases, economic and social issues while external problems like invasions and nomads taking place at the same time. After both empires collapsed, the regions faced change in their culture like the spread of Buddhism and Christianity and adaptation to the previous empires customs. The fall of both empires occurred for similar but contrasting reasons at different times; the Han dynasty …show more content…
These epidemic diseases transpired in the second and third centuries for both the Han and Roman empires. Smallpox and measles were common diseases as well as the bubonic plague that took a tool on the population; in Rome, for example, a smallpox outbreak along with other epidemic diseases and war decreased the population by one-fourth of the previous size. In China the spread of disease occurred at a later time but had similar effects. Additionally, economic issues may have contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire and the Han dynasty. Epidemic disease not only decreased the population but caused a decline in trade. The Han dynasty also faced challenges with a decline in trade; both empires turned towards self-sufficiency. Both empires faced economic pressure involving taxes as well. In China, the government had trouble collecting taxes to support their army, whereas in Rome the taxes began to rise. Roman economic pressure extended; as trade decreased, the value of money went down. Farm fields became overused and started to lack production bringing in poor harvests; the value of gold and silver decreased. However, China faced rebellions from peasant, such as the Yellow …show more content…
An example of an external factor includes both empires dealing with clashes from outside individuals. In China, a semi-peaceful relationship with the nomads always had a chance of dangerous raids. In western Rome, Germanic invasions led to a downfall in most of western Rome. Furthermore, the western Roman empire faced low funds for defense and trouble finding patriotic soldiers. As well, a notable group of invaders in China were the Xiongnu who even created the Sino-Xiongnu Wars between 133 BCE to 89 CE. The Chinese and the Xiongnu fought in an important area of the silk road: the western regions of China. Han ended victoriously, but the win almost demolished their government. Most of the Xiongnu went and joined other nomadic people; some joined the Huns which would invaded Rome. Attila, a warrior-king, formed a powerful military. To begin their attack on Rome, Attila and his army attacked the Germanic peoples causing them to seep into the Roman empire for safety. Little resistance faced Attila and his army and they eventually led to western half of the empire destroyed. The end of imperial authority occurred after general Odoacer removed the last empire in Rome, Romulus Augustulus. Nomadic people built states succeeding the fall of the Roman empire. China went a different route, and after a chaotic state three kingdoms were

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