Faith In Henrik Ibsen's No, Thank You, John By Christina Rossetti

830 Words 4 Pages
Within both Henrik Ibsen’s ‘A Doll’s House’ and Rossetti’s poetry, the idea of a pressurised faith is evident in terms of religious belief. Ibsen initiates this by setting his play over the three-day span of the Christmas period – a trait of the naturalistic style of theatre that he wrote within. He demonstrates this by having the central character of Nora Helmer fixate on the Christmas tree place in the centre of the stage. The use of a Christian holiday to demonstrate the importance of religious faith is also evident in Christina Rossetti’s poem ‘Good Friday’. Due to the religious title the connection to the theme of faith is obvious. However, Rossetti presents her own Christian God in this poem as one that Virginia Woolf would later describe …show more content…
All Nora Helmer knows of religion and the men within her life have taught belief to her: Pastor Hansen, Torvald Helmer, and her husband. In particular she says: “I’ll think about it… Work out if Pastor Hansen’s belief was right – for me”. This demonstrates, through the use of personal pronouns, an awakening of feminine spirituality. Similarly in Rossetti’s ‘No, Thank You, John’ the use of personal pronouns is also prevalent, and whilst Rossetti is primarily referring to a marriage proposal rejection – an event that occurred personally to her – in a loose sense she is rejecting the religious orthodox ideals taught to women by the patriarchal society. Thus demonstrating the theme of a tremendous faith is evident within both authors’ …show more content…
In ‘A Doll’s House’ the characters of Christine Linde and Nora Helmer share a close emotional bond, possibly due to the isolation felt by women in the gender segregated society that the play was initially set. When Christine first arrives on stage, Nora welcomes her in a familiar way, despite the years that have passed: “There! Now let’s sit down here by the stove and be comfortable”. This scene, as well as displaying the domestic role of women, exemplifies the faith placed in sororal bonds as Nora and Christine, without realising it rely on each other for emotional support. Similarly, in Christina Rossetti’s ‘Goblin Market’ the sororal bond between Laura and Lizzie is emphasised in a warm embrace: “In the cooling weather, with clasping arms and cautioning lips, with tingling cheeks and finger tips. ‘Lie close’”. The importance of faith in regards to sororal bonds is further shown in the salvific figures within the relationship. In the case of ‘A Doll’s House’ Christine Linde provides this refuge for Nora. It is evident that Christine has provided this service since the two women were at school together as Christine says, “Nora, Nora, haven’t you grown up yet?”. The differences between the two female characters is further emphasised in the portrayal of Janet Mcteer’s Nora Helmer in 1996: she is a fidgeting Nora who cannot remain still, whilst the actress who

Related Documents