Faith And Reason, By Pope John Paul II

Good Essays
Natalia Perez
Father Jose Losoya
Essay Question
11 October 2016

Essay Question #1
“In order to live the Gospel and share it with others we don’t need philosophy.”
Evaluate this statement in the light of what is said in the Introduction and Chapters 1 to 3 of Fides et Ratio. Knowing that faith helps us to arrive at the truth of things, there are still some people who believe that in order to love the Gospel and share it with others we don’t need philosophy. The thing is that faith evolves around everything and faith and reason are connected in many ways. In the encyclical Fides et Ratio (meaning Faith and Reason) written by Pope John Paul II we understand in a deeper level how faith and reason are interlocked. In Pope John Paul II first
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In fact, they find it hard to believe that faith and reason are connected as one. In Pope John Paul II encyclical we see with various supporting ideas how faith and reason are both needed to live the Gospel, and how various philosophers have influenced this statement. In the following three chapters, we have come to terms and gained a better understanding of both faith and reason as separates and faith and reason together. Subsequently this encyclical helps us reflect on faith and reason in a deeper level to perceive the truth about philosophy and faith. The purpose of Fides et Ratio is for us Catholics to understand this to become closer to the Gospel in a spiritual level and he also wants to explain and defend the view that they both have equally necessary and complementary roles in coming to the truth. He implies how not understanding both terms spiritually saps the power of both of them and wants us to understand the Catholic Church’s objections to rationalism. Finally, the purpose of Pope John Paul II encyclical is for Catholics to appreciate some of the challenges which modernity raises for the Church and understand some responses purposed in Fides et

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