Fairness and Purity: Why American Baseball Players Should Know Better

1920 Words Aug 2nd, 2013 8 Pages
Fairness and Purity:
Why American Baseball Players Should Know Better
Max P. Farhi
Keuka College
February 2013

Fairness and Purity:
Why American Baseball Players Should Know Better

Reading the recent articles “We, the Public, Place the Best Athletes on Pedestals” by William Moller, and “Cheating and CHEATING” by Joe Posnanski, I found occasion to consider the use of steroids in baseball for the first time. In these essays, Moller and Posnanski tapped into the running commentary about performance-enhancing substances and their relative acceptability in the baseball arena (no pun intended). “We, the Public, Place the Best Athletes on Pedestals” proclaimed that “the entire steroid outcry is pure hypocrisy” (Moller, 2009, p.548),
…show more content…
Here, “Cheating and CHEATING” has presented the argument that, moreover, the biggest transgression of the steroid user in baseball is not the use of the substance itself, but the brazen disregard for fans’ emotional investment in the players’ moral standing. According to the public, using steroids is cheating, and cheating is wrong. Here we can see an example of how the culture of baseball, the “All-American sport”, reflects the cultural values of America: where cheating and drugs are symbols in a larger moral system, held together by our cultural values, that fly in the face of hard work and purity. In “Cheating and CHEATING”, Posnanski posited that both steroids and amphetamines in baseball are essentially no worse, and no less traditional, than the long-held practice of stealing signs (Posnanski, 2010). Yet when their use trespasses onto the field of the fans’ awareness, the issue becomes substantial. Taking this sentiment a run further, William Moller’s article “We, the Public, Place the Best Athletes on Pedestals” proposed that the very same American culture that champions such virtues as hard work and purity, places fame, wealth, and accomplishment above all else. Moller described a cultural value

Related Documents