Fahrenheit 451 Language Analysis

In Ray Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451, he uses many types of figurative language to show the prominent theme of action vs inaction. Guy Montag had worked many years with Captain Beatty at the fire department causing them to build a friendship. Yet when Beatty discovers that Montag has books in his home he goes to burn the house down (the punishment for possessing books). The scene quickly escalates and Montag ultimately ends up killing Beatty via flame thrower. “They turned, their faces like blanched meat, streaming sweat; he beat their heads, knocking off their helmets and bringing them down on themselves. They fell and lay without moving.” Bradbury uses a metaphor to describe the how Beatty looks while he is getting cremated. Mannikins are commonly known to just stand there …show more content…
“They turned, their faces like blanched meat, streaming sweat; he beat their heads, knocking off their helmets and bringing them down on themselves. They fell and lay without moving.” To show the fear the men had on their faces Bradbury uses descriptive imagery. The two men obviously had never seen anyone stand up for something they believed in like Montag did giving the reason for why they were so scared of the former fireman. Once Montag takes care of all the firemen he still has one more obstacle to take care of before he can escape, the Mechanical Hound; a lean, mean, death machine set to hunt and kill anyone who he is told or discovers is in possession of books. Fortunately for Montag he still has the flamethrower and toasts the hound before he kills Montag. “He felt it scrabble and seize his leg and stab the needle in for a moment before the fire snapped the Hound up in the air, burst its metal bones at the joints, and blew out its interior in the single flushing of red colour like a skyrocket fastened to the street.” Another use of imagery shows up in the death of the Mechanical

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