Extinction In Marine Life

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Mass Ocean Extinction Extinction has occurred naturally throughout the history of earth, but something more sinister is brewing in our oceans. There have been five natural extinction events, and each event had a drastic on the ocean and marine life, especially coral reefs (Veron, 2008). Human impact is creating an extinction level event, an extinction rates of species in and out of the ocean have never been higher. This paper will focus on the causes of mass extinction, human impact, and effects on marine life. This paper will also draw on three separate experiments that show extinction rates in our oceans on a smaller scale. Veron (2008) breaks downs the changes in ocean chemistry into two groups, causes directly …show more content…
Plankton are a cornerstone in marine life. Plankton play in important role in gas exchange and how much carbon dioxide is absorbed. Increased water temperatures may benefit some species, and kill off others. The study compared “patterns of taxonomic diversity and rates of extinction and origination to analogous macrostratigraphic quantities” (Peters et al, 2013). The results found physiochemical changes in the atmospheric relationship with the ocean, and the decline and recent evolution of plankton trying to conform to a changing ocean. Salmon populations that interact with the ocean and freshwater are also dropping in quantity and range, according to Otero et all (2011). Environmental and human impacts are affecting the breeding migration of these fish. Warmer water temperatures, overfishing, and dams are changing the fish’s migration behavior. The study found a correlation between the presence of dams and high levels of runoff lead to low catches, compared to fish results without runoff and dams. This shows the decrease in population due to pollution and human …show more content…
The researchers searched for rarity and extinction risks by looking at abundance, geographic range, size and specialization. They wanted to predict species at risk by “determining the species most vulnerable to increasing degradation of coral reef habitats requires identification of the ecological traits that increase extinction risk” (Hobbs et all, 2010). The study focused on pygmy angelfish, but also the fish’s use of habitat, resources, and diet. They researchers found multiple risk factors and determined three components, small range size, low abundance, and specialization that make a fish rare and at risk for extinction. Small range size, which meant a smaller habitat which is more at risk than a large range and distribution. Low abundance of fish leads to lower possibility to reproduce and is easier for the population to be wiped out by predation. Specialization prevents species from adapting to other habitat, because they rely so much on their traits and corresponding environment. These risk factors coupled with causes of extinction can lead to a mass exodus of marine species from life on

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