Explain What Was The Purpose Of The Convention Of 1787

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1. What was wrong with the Articles?
The Articles of Confederation created a federal government that lacked the necessary powers to legislate or do a number of things. The central government could not regulate trade, so there were 13 different and inefficient economic policies in each colony. They had to ask the state governments for troops and taxes, which they frequently failed to get. The government also required an agreement of 9 states to pass measures, which made passing anything very difficult. In addition, there were many disagreements over the Articles, such as how to represent states in the legislature.
2. What was the purpose of the convention of 1787? What issues caused disagreement among the convention’s delegates?
The purpose of the convention of 1787 was to revise the Articles of Confederation. This purpose was then eventually discarded in favor of creating a whole new constitution. One of the biggest issues causing disagreement among the delegates was
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It also created a separation of power with three different branches of government as opposed to simply a legislature. The Constitution created a bicameral legislature, one with equal representation and house based on population, as opposed to a unicameral legislature with equal representation. The Constitution also gave the federal government significantly more power, such as to tax, to regulate trade, to control the currency, and to pass any necessary laws in order to carry out their

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