Randy Milholland On The Great Gatsby

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Humans establish expectations in an attempt to better control the world around them. However, Randy K. Milholland points out that, “It hurts to find out that what you wanted doesn’t match what you dreamed it would be.” He is expressing that when expectations are set regarding a situation or conflict, the actual outcomes are often disappointing in light of the predetermined “reality”. Humans enjoy trying to create their own reality because it provides a specific type of all-encompassing power. Unfortunately, these expectations are not always met, leaving the dreamer disappointed and thinking about the more favorable outcomes and what “could have been”. Milholland’s statement accurately describes humans’ idealistic relationship with their dreams, …show more content…
He reaches towards the light, towards Daisy, and towards the life with “old money” that he so intensely desires, thinking that if he were to acquire this symbol of his aspirations, and was then able to assimilate it into his own life, he would finally be able to live with the same amount of prestige as those with “old money” did. Unfortunately for Gatsby, his inherent personality traits prevent him from achieving happiness. Even when he was younger, Gatsby was a determined and ambitious individual. He always strove to be a better person and do greater things with his life (which led to his dream of becoming like those with “old money”), and as demonstrated by the list of resolves that his father shows Nick, he works very hard to achieve his goals. Staying true to his hardworking nature, Gatsby decides that he will go to any lengths to impress Daisy, which includes, but is not limited to, illegal business as a bootlegger, moving into a mansion across the bay from her and her husband, and throwing large, expensive parties to try to lure her back into his life. And along with this determination, Gatsby also has an expansive imagination. Ever since he was young he wanted to create a …show more content…
As a scientist, Victor is obsessed with discovering how the natural world works and, eventually, this obsession becomes more specific: he wants to create life. Not just life, but a companion as well. This new being would look up to Victor as a god and rely on him as a guardian; he wanted to hold power over a race all his own, similar to how Gatsby wanted the prestige associated with having “old money” . The creature, who he built out of only the most beautiful features he could find, would symbolize the breadth of his scientific achievements and his overall superiority as a scientist and as a human being. However, his dreams of ruling over a new race and achieving glory were shattered when he finally succeeded in bringing his creature to life. Victor is immediately shocked at how ugly his creation is and flees his lab in terror. Instead of being the symbol of success and beauty that he wanted it to be, the creature is a perversion of everything that had tried so hard to achieve. The features that he had specifically picked out to look beautiful contrasted each other so sharply that it was grotesque and couldn’t be viewed as anything other than monstrous. Up until this point, Victor is a hardworking, ambitious scientist who, like Gatsby, would go to any lengths to achieve his dream, even if that meant digging up graves and working for days without

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