Book Of Exodus Structure Essay

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The Structure of the Passage The Book of Exodus contains some of the most important people, as well as events. In the Book of Exodus, Moses was a prominent character that was discussed seemingly throughout the text. The Book of Exodus is a segment within the Pentateuch, which contains the first five books of the Old Testament. There are three obvious themes that are emphasized in Exodus, which are deliverance, the covenant, and the Promised Land. The first portion of the Book, which is divided into two segments is the first eighteen chapters, which discuss Moses’ life, the troubles that the Israelites’ faced while in Egypt, and the events and plagues that led the Israelites’ to finally leave Egypt. Moses’ role as a prophet shows that …show more content…
Falling into line with the feasts of Pentecost and Tabernacles. Celebrations of the Passover are recorded at Mount Sinai and entering Canaan. The ultimate significance of the Passover, though, is not in its sociology or history, but in its unique role in the life of the Jewish people. It was, and continues to be the festival of freedom and redemption par excellence. Representative of God’s love and saving acts, it always gave the people hope in the face of physical and spiritual oppression. As a family celebration, it served as a unifying bond that was passed on from generation to generation. Its strength is seen in its emergence as the most important of Jewish festivals, and its continuing relevance to the needs of the people, whether it be freedom from social discrimination or the acquisition of religious liberty.
The secret of the impact of the Exodus is that it does not present itself as ancient history. Since the key way to remember the Exodus, is reenactment, the event offers itself as an ongoing experience in human history. As free people relive the Exodus, it turns memory into moral dynamic. The experience of slavery that breaks and crushes slaves does not destroy the free people. It evokes feelings of repulsion and determination to help others escape the

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