Psychodynamic Model In Psychology

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I am particularly drawn to the Psychodynamic Model that human function is determined by in conscience physiological forces. They attempt to discover and treat incidents caused from past traumas and inner conflicts. I admit I use to get confused by the basic id, ego, superego concepts, which have been clarified in this chapter. Particularly I can relate to all of the defense mechanisms of the ego: Repression, denial, projection, rationalization, displacement, intellectualization and regression. I would go as far as to say I probably use one of these “mechanisms of rescue” every day. Yet when it comes to denial, as I mature I use this less and less. It is fascinating to see it play in society. Including my sister and my three year old nephew! …show more content…
When I got divorced I went to a psychologist who started to cry to me and talk about her divorce, moreover I was charged for the session. She apologized a week later but I was not interested in seeking her services any longer. Recently I saw a psychiatrist, thinking perhaps because he is an MD this experience will be different, but tactlessly, I don’t’ think he even listened. Ten sessions later, he kept asking “what did you say” and confusing me with another patient. Then had the audacity to say he could help, but I had to see him for a minimum of two times per week. It was obvious to me what he desired to “see” was my bi-weekly cash payment. In retrospect from seeing him I discovered I had a mild depression and had a yearning to feel heard. I had gone through a traumatic experience and had not told anyone, I did not even tell the doctor, as he did not convey confidence. Eventually the depression dissipated fours month after I left the situation, i.e. relationship. In spite my experience was not favorable the meta-analysis statistic described in chapter 3 is correct, my degree of depression improved. I was not in the 5-10% of patients which get worse from …show more content…
She is a lesbian and has been with her partner for more than 20 years. She told me she had been waiting many years to publicly celebrate her union with the family. She announced her sexual preference in her early 20’s and we grew up seeing her and Anne together. Yet the announcement ironically came as a bit of a shock. We are a big extended Catholic, Cuban family, from my mom’s generation only her parents and only 1 aunt attended the ceremony, yet most of the cousins went. Diani my cousin grew up in a well-adjusted environment; she went to college and is vice president of a department at Blue-Cross Blue shield. We were raised in what was once a small town, Lakeland. Diani left Lakeland to not humiliate the family because she is responsible and loves her family very much. So how does this tie into chapter 3, clinical assessment, diagnosis and treatment? In Lakeland in the 1980’s she saw a Catholic, Cuban, family friend psychiatrist who diagnosed her as being in perfect mental health. Imagine what would have been of Diani’s life if he would have allowed his beliefs to interfere with his assessments? Dr. Montero was not influenced by multi-cultural hotspots in assessments and diagnosis. I can assume his test must have included: clinical interviews- either structured or unstructured, projective testing, personality inventory, etc. I am not aware if she forewent neurological testing. I wonder if homosexuality was an illness

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