Institutionalization Of Slavery

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Slavery is the act of forcing people to endure exhaustingly hard labor along with providing restricted freedom or none at all. The means of enslaving men and women goes back all the way to 1760 B.C., when the Babylonians were at their peak. In 1619, Dutch settlers introduced numerous captured Africans to the American people in Jamestown,Virginia. This sparked the evolution of the slavery system throughout the newly established country. However, many Americans themselves (frequently African-Americans) have seemed to misconstrue that Americans performed slavery the most and in the cruelest of ways. The excessive use of slavery dates all the way back to the Code of Hammurabi (c. 1760 B.C.). As usual, the slavery had no gender specifics. …show more content…
Slave labor was in fact more economically effective than purchasing food or a home. However, in ancient times, all labor was free so it was utilized with less circumspection. The most ironic part of the whole practice was that Blacks are known to have established the first civilizations and cities in the world. Along with their creation, they were the firsts that felt the need to institute slavery. It wasn’t until the fifteenth century that slavery was primarily undergone by Africans. “Contrary to conventional thought, Slavery was NOT only endured by Blacks, all peoples have at one time or another been enslaved. The irony is that it is Blacks who appear to have created the institution of Slavery. As the creators of civilization, and the builders of the world 's first cities, Blacks logically were the first to have a need for slaves, as a source of free labor. Slavery in ancient cultures was known to occur in civilizations as old as Sumer, and it was found in every civilization, including Ancient Egypt, the Akkadian Empire, Assyria, Ancient Greece, Rome and parts of its …show more content…
This statement is slightly false. Although the proclamation was passed, slaves were still not free in Texas until 1865. In 1865, nearly two hundred thousand slaves were set free in Texas on June 19th. In fact, African-Americans used to celebrate the day, which is named “Juneteenth”. Even after this day, former slaves were being subject to the disingenuous act of debt peonage. This peonage lasted until 1867 when president Franklin D. Roosevelt had the Anti-Peonage Law passed. Any whites found guilty of engaging in this unlawful act was prosecuted and most likely jailed up until

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