Analysis Of The Sociological Imagination By C. Wright Mills

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1. In The Sociological Imagination, C. Wright Mills states that the promise of the Enlightenment was the reason it should lead to freedom, and also believing that his statement in sociology has met this promise. It has met its promise because according to Mills, “the liberating notion of progress by reason, the faith in science as an unmixed good, the demand for popular education and the faith in its political meaning for democracy-all these ideals of the enlightenment have rested upon the happy assumption of the inherent relation of and freedom” (Mills 1959). Therefore, people who can rationalize have freedom and that the enlightenment promised that it can happen. For example, in the works of Marxist, he discussed how men are caught in the …show more content…
It has been stated that feminist sociology was a sub-area of conflict theory. This is an accurate description of feminist sociology because it is based on addressing the issue of women’s silencing in the relations mediated by writing and print in which have dominated. According to Dorothy Smith, she studied how sociology has been male dominated. Throughout the origins and texts of sociology, there were barely any women involved in the discipline of sociology. Furthermore, Smith mentioned that “there is a gap between where we are and the means we have to express and act. It means that the concerns, interests, and experiences forming our “culture” are those of men in positions of dominance whose perspectives are built on the silence of women (and of others).” Smith views the concerns and interests of women in our society on how they have been excluded such as political views. For conflict theory, it is a theory based on power and in Smith’s view men have the power to do what they want to do. “Men have authority in the world of thought as members of a social category and not as individuals” (Smith 1987). One of the issues that Smith goes through and is still one of the issues of today is inequality of pay among women. In the high occupational jobs today, men get paid about fifty cents more than women. Despite the pay today, before, women in the late 19th century were denied to have access to higher education beyond the skills of reading and writing (Smith 1987). It took a …show more content…
For post-modern sociology, it has been stated that it is a contradiction in terms. It is a contradiction in its term, because it questions sociology based on the theories being studied such as functionalism theory in deviance, Karl Marx on capitalism, and Mills on the sociological imagination. Another thing that makes post-modernism a contradiction to sociology is that it rejects the epistemological assumptions, refutes methodological conventions, resists knowledge claims obscures all versions of truth, and dismisses policy recommendations. In addition, post-modernists urge people to be comfortable in the absence of certainty, learn to live without explanation, and accept the new philosophical relativism. Therefore, post-modernists want sociologists or future sociologists, to question everything they learned about sociology. In addition, post-modernists go over a term called “subjectivity” which means to refer to individuality and self-awareness- the condition of being a subject (Roseneau 1991). Post-modernist talk about subjectivity as a way to say that they are “post-subjective” when they talk about the decline of subjectivity but not meaning that they want to be objective. Post-modernism also offers primarily negative assessment of the modern subject and that some post-modernists are generally anti-subject. They criticize the subject for seizing power, attributing meaning, dominating and oppressing (Rosenau 1991). In conclusion, post-modernism questions and contradicts

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