Examples Of Shame, Despair And Solitude In The Scarlet Letter

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“Shame, Despair, and Solitude” taught Hester that the consequences of committing a sin “had made her strong, but taught her much amiss” (165). For example, violating a law brought her shame, and she concealed herself from the public as much as possible. In addition, despair taught Hester that she cannot reverse what she did and can only feel regretful for the sin. Lastly, solitude informed her what it feels like to be isolated from the townspeople and how they reject you for one thing you did in the past. Moreover, the sin that Hester executed also brought a miserable state upon Arthur Dimmesdale. While Hester assures Dimmesdale that he can live his life without Chillingworth and everything will be alright, he cries, “O Hester! Thou tellest …show more content…
While heading for town, Dimmesdale thought that he was in a dream, but soon realizes that this is his reality. Furthermore, after encountering Hester and Pearl, it appears as if Dimmesdale has a new view on life and the town he’s living in. For example, the narrator states, “The minister’s own will, and Hester’s will, and the fate that grew between them, had wrought this transformation. It was the same town as heretofore; but the same minister returned not from the forest” (178). Additionally, Dimmesdale claims that he is a new man, with a new path, and that the “old minister” was left in the forest. Before reaching home, a church elder acknowledged Dimmesdale with kindness, and initiated a conversation with him for just a minute. While speaking, he could hardly retain himself from announcing “blasphemous suggestions” that were on his mind. As he continued along the street, Dimmesdale again encountered a widowed elder who was lonely, however, her depressed mood switches to joy when she spots Dimmesdale because he had been her minister for more than thirty years. The woman is content whenever she heard his kind words, but in this moment, he “could recall no text of Scripture, nor aught else, except a brief, pithy, and, as it then appeared to him, unanswerable argument against the immortality of the human soul” …show more content…
Essentially, the quote means “On a black field, the letter A in red”. The symbolism in this quote is that even though Hester has gone to her grave, the guilt of the sin she committed will be with her forever. My overall feeling on the novel is that I thought it fascinating how the one forbidden act of passion could forever modify three characters’ lives. For instance, I believe that part of Dimmesdale’s sickness was caused by his unbearable guilt of the sin he committed with Hester Prynne. His guilt and shame was ultimately eating his health away, but just before he passed away, he confessed his sin so he would not die with it. Moreover, Chillingworth was a man built on revenge and that’s all that mattered to him after he found out about Dimmesdale. Finally, Hester Prynne, could never really forgive herself because she never wanted to take the scarlet letter off. However, in the last chapter, she aided to the people who felt remorse and sorrowful, so maybe then it was a symbol of relief. Moreover, I appreciated Hawthorne 's writing because even though the novel was published in the 1850s, his style of writing is still relatable and comprehensible. The characters that he created all had their own perspectives on different subject matters, and that’s one of the reasons why this book was so enjoyable to me. Furthermore, the themes that are presented in the novel are still relevant today, for

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