Examples Of Quantitative Research

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Research is an interesting process. At first, one might be tempted to over-simplify the term as meaning to reference the findings of another. However, I would contend the process is far more robust. Granted, in the most technical of perspectives ‘re’-‘search’ can be defined as to pursue again. Yet, a complex process such as research resists such a simplistic definition. Research is approached for a vast array of purposes, in broad formats. While the meaning of the word is wide, the purpose driving the process takes on three primary types.
Quantitative research, as suggested by the base word, establishes a quantity. This is not to say this type of research is limited only to numerical values; instead, it seeks to establish measureable
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One sample of this type of research is an experiment conducted by Nimet Akben, a member of the faculty at Ankara University in Turkey. Akben titled his research, “The Effect of Open Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities on Prospective Teachers ' Misconceptions about Matter”. The research approach has indicators which suggest this to be an example of quantitative research. First, the study establishes very clear variables which is a hallmark of quantitative research. Next, the evaluation of subjects using an open ended assessment to generate statistical data further indicates a quantitative design. In the article (Akben), subjects were administered “an open-ended test was administered to prospective teachers to investigate whether they had misconceptions” (p. 165). Finally, researchers employed a questionnaire to further establish data (p. 165). The Akben study stands as a good example of quantitative research in …show more content…
This kind of research centers between quantitative and qualitative research. It seeks to incorporate the strengths of both in pursuit of a more holistic view of the test subject. Creswell (2013) defines this type of research well by saying, “Mixed Methods research is an approach to inquiry involving collecting both quantitative and qualitative data, integrating the two forms of data, and using distinct designs that may involve philosophical assumptions and theoretical frameworks” (p. 4). Mixed Methods pretty much follows the respective approaches for quantitative and qualitative research. A deviation from the other methods of research is how the results are interpreted. Mixed Methods incorporates phases of this process which allows the researcher to view the quantitative and qualitative data and observations side-by-side or merged together depending on their

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