Plato's Examination Of Order

762 Words 4 Pages
Human thought, activity and organization of life all suggest that order exists in this universe. The ability people have to limit chaos and develop systems that encourage teamwork and prosperity is astounding. Although sin can limit the scope of manmade order, humankind has done an adequate job of using their brains to come up with processes in order to deal with their surrounding environment and fellow people. This can be seen throughout history, all the way from the beginning of everything up to modern times. In order to understand this truth, an examination of order in biblical creation, as understood by Plato, and order during the founding of the United States of America will be held. God is not a God of disorder, as Paul points out in …show more content…
Plato was a student of the equally great thinker Socrates, and came into his own by developing his theory of forms. This was the way Plato brought order to the universe in his own mind. Essentially, he theorized that existence was two tiered. The world humans live in is filled with constant change which we perceive with our senses. However, there is another reality in which exists ideal, everlasting truth. On the word of Plato, the truth we see in this world is subpar in relation to those eternal truths. They are just shadows of the ideal “forms.” Plato established the first school of philosophy, named the Academy, in 387 BC.4 He put much effort into understanding the universe and promoted the idea mentally ordering things in one’s …show more content…
Many of the issues the colonists had with their mother country had to do with order. Economically, those in the new world were upset with how much control England had over their commerce. This manifested in heavy taxation. Great Britain was in deep debt following the Seven Years’ War and saw the colonies as an emergency piggy bank to draw from. Some of the acts passed to tax the colonies included the Stamp Acts, Townshend Acts of 1767, and the Tea Acts. Another influence that drove the colonies to revolution was changing ideas concerning political philosophy. Colonial thinkers such as Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson were influenced by the ideas of John Locke that promoted government for the people by the people. The way major players in the new world wanted their government to be ordered differed drastically from the wants of England. Finally, many were convinced that their ancestors had come to America because God set it aside from the corrupt state of Europe to be a shining example of morality and order. These combined differences, all relating back to order, led to the American Revolution, one of the most unlikely, yet amazing, events in

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