Examples Of Moral Dilemma

Superior Essays
Moral Dilemma Ethics Essay
Imagine you discover one of your close friends has been falsely embellishing his academic achievements, claiming he has several graduate degrees. You are concerned about him and want to confirm the truth. When you gracefully approach him with your curiosity, your friend denies the accusation. Instead of giving counter arguments to prove his claims, he only rejects yours. Time has passed and you are no longer close friends. Recently you discover he is now engaged to a woman you know. With mutual friends connecting you and the woman, you ponder on what action you should take next. As much as you don’t want to associate with this man again, you adopt his fiancée’s perspective. If you were the man’s fiancée, you feel
…show more content…
The woman would eventually marry this deceitful man and then more possibilities would arise. The woman might be married to a man who could instantly lose his job if his employers were to find out and then not only would the man suffer, but the woman too. Would the person feel bad for not intervening and possibly saving them from this financial loss? What if the man wasn’t just lying about his education and the woman is now married to man who has lied to her their entire relationship. Would the person feel guilty knowing they could’ve saved her from marrying a man she didn’t
Wills3
fully know? Maybe the woman marries the man and someone else finds out about his lies, and eventually the woman’s credibility is also questioned because they believe she must be supporting his fraud. Would the sender wish they would’ve warned the woman so she could decide for herself if she wanted to be associated with this man’s actions?
There are numerous amounts of scenarios the sender has to contemplate over, knowing that whichever decision they make, will indeed have specific effects on the woman, the man, and themselves. When referring to consequentialist theory, the morally right decision supported would be to tell the woman. However, there are other theories that can be applied to this situation, to conclude which action is most morally right. Another moral theory that can be utilized to support telling the secret to the
…show more content…
Therefore, they judge the action’s “nature” and decide whether or not the act is morally sound (102). Immanuel Kant, a well-known philosopher in the deontologist category, has a theory one could use to debate what action is morally right in this particular case. According to Kant’s theory, “all our duties, all the moral categorical imperatives, (what we should do in all situations, regardless of our wants and needs) can be logically derived from the categorical imperative” (103). When applying the categorical imperative, there are two versions needed to consider. Kant lists two criteria that scale the first version of the categorical imperative. The first: “if everyone can consistently act on the maxim (general rule) in similar situations (103). The second: “you would be willing to let that happen” (103). In Kant’s reasoning, if you are willingly accept the action as universal for all to follow, it must be morally permissible. The second version to the categorical imperative is applying the rule of the “means-end principle”. The means- end principle states that we need to treat people (including ourselves) as individuals who have “intrinsic worth” rather than “tools” others can use for their own personal gain

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Act Utilitarianism

    • 1234 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This gives us a way to figure out moral actions and to make moral reasoning. It is a method by which to decide any action to be what might be morally important. To Kant, the moral law is universal and rational. The categorical imperative is the way of developing the foundation for any action that can fulfill universality and…

    • 1234 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kant offers the categorical imperative theory which basically tell us how to know which actions are right. Therefore, we may be able to know what our moral duties are. Immanuel Kant introduces two key elements of his moral philosophy. The first one, good will as the only thing…

    • 1012 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    In the light of this paragraph, the P1 might be unfolded into two sub-propositions: first, reason is the source of all acts and actions (P1-a), second, all acts must be from a good reason (P1-b). The first sub-proposition (P1-a) justifies the source of human activity in term of rationality ,i.e. ; reason as a faculty or will or practical reason. Meanwhile, the later sub-proposition (P1-b) attempts to identify in what sense we recognize the rationality of acts and actions; i.e., to act at least on some good reasons or genuine…

    • 1852 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Moral Reasoning Case Study

    • 1035 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Even though Mill says that these decisions should be rational, they still take into mind how others feel. Kant says that all moral problems can be handled by applying an impartial, pure, rational principle to a particular case. Individuals can gain moral understanding by instructing people on how to pursue particular objectives most rationally. Immanuel Kant created the categorical imperative which is based upon the idea that morality is derived from rationality and all moral judgements are logically supported. Kant argues that this is the standard of rationality, and it is how we can gain moral understanding.…

    • 1035 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kant believes that all moral judgments must be universalizable. That is, if we say that an act is right for one person, then we are committed to saying that it is right for all other relevantly similar persons in relevantly similar circumstances. In the same manner if an act is wrong for other people then it is wrong for any one person unless there is some difference that justifies making an exception. This principle of universalizability expresses the simple point…

    • 750 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    To conclude, this paper had the purpose of discuss, compare and contrast utilitarianism’s and Kant’s respective theories. Such theories consist on the characteristics one must have in order to be a member of the moral community. We conclude that for Kant’s view one must have autonomy and be rational. Also, we study the utilitarianism view in which one is member of the moral sphere if is capable to…

    • 880 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kant's Moral Ethics

    • 1515 Words
    • 7 Pages

    In his Groundwork, German philosopher Immanuel Kant seeks to ground the metaphysics of morals in concepts of pure reason. Central to his work is “the categorical imperative,” that is, the formal procedure by which all rational beings may evaluate the moral worth of an action on the basis of its universalizability. In this essay, I will examine Kant’s ethic, specifically the categorical imperative, and assess the problems that arise within it. The fundamental basis of Kant’s moral philosophy appears to exist in opposition to those of other moral theories, namely consequentialism and teleologicalism. For Kant, the moral worth of an action lies in the intention of its actor, rather than its consequences or ability to produce happiness.…

    • 1515 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Ben’s circumstances, and circumstances of similar nature, if he were to act according to Kantian ethics, his approach would begin with carrying out the action that is aligned with a good-will and a moral duty to act. To Kantian ethics, human rationality and the development of the good-will are of central importance. Kant believed that since humans have the ability to reason, they must use their rationale to recognize the demands of reason, “for reason recognizes the establishment of a good will as its highest practical destination” (Marino 194). For Kant, it’s not the consequences of the actions that truly matter, but the motivation of doing them out of a good-will. The only genuinely good actions are the actions done exclusively out of respect for the moral rules.…

    • 905 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This paper will discuss an ethical evaluation using Kantian’s theory in a lying case stated below. What is Kantian’s theory? Kantian’s theory is an ethical theory that relies on the moral goodness of all people. “Kant argued that there is an unconditional good related to rationality, the moral law, and moral duty. The theory is centered on the duty to act based upon respect for the moral law or legitimate moral rules (104).” In other words, all individuals must uphold an unconditional good, to do this, one must be a rational person.…

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kant's Moral Theory Essay

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages

    A maxim is a “subjective principle that governs action”; a maxim is a rational individual’s actions that are justified with accordance to one’s duty. However, one’s maxim can be tested through categorical imperative which is how one’s maxim is moved from application to an individual to being universally applicable. Furthermore, the categorical imperative is applicable to all rational agents and disobeying its application is contrary to reason and to Kant’s theory is considered morally wrong. In contrast to Kant’s moral theory, rule utilitarianism states that an act is determined to be morally right on wrong based on its consequences. Also, generally speaking, an act based on utilitarianism should bring about the most happiness out of all other alternative acts.…

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays