Examples Of Just War Theory

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The “Just War Theory” (JWT) is a body of thought that has been constructed over many centuries. The theory is widely contested and has many critics. JWT discusses certain situations and instances in which the use of physical force is “justified” to accomplish desired outcomes. I consider this physical force or aggressive action an act of “war.” In my work, I will discuss how the environment is incorporated into this, and if it plays a factor in justifying “aggressive acts.” I will also take an in depth look at “Jus in Bello” considerations, or combatants actions while engaged in war, to amplify meaningful facts on JWT. Lastly, I will illustrate how the environment is posing a grave threat to certain inhabitants, and how military mobilization …show more content…
Augustine, the ancient Christian theologian, stated that War “could be necessary in the face of certain dangers and lawful if conducted appropriately in the pursuit of peace.” St. Thomas Aquinas would go on to define types of situations in which war should be considered a justified act. These notable Philosophers would lay the foundation for many current day Acts and guidelines. The Charter of the United Nations and the Geneva Conventions lay out a detailed description of how Nation States and individual Soldiers should conduct themselves during armed conflict. However, we know that present day conflict in places like Syria and Iraq, present a bit of a conundrum when discussing these guidelines. Should a Nation State such as the United States adjust their tactics to satisfy an enemy who commits genocide and rape of innocent civilians? Are the U.N. Charter and Geneva Conventions outdated due to this new and emerging threat? For the time being, America has held strong to our fighting guidelines, but the environment could be an underlying factor that is rarely spoken …show more content…
Extremists flew two aircraft into both World Trade Centre buildings. The collapse of both towers caused a very serious and acute environmental disaster. When the aircraft struck the Twin Towers thousands of liters of jet fuel burned at temperatures above 1000 degree Celsius. This caused an atmospheric plume to form, consisting of toxic materials such as metals, asbestos and hydrochloric acid. The majority of atmospheric contamination was from the buildings. Ground Zero, where the deemed “act of war” occurred, a large amount of smoking material burned sporadically for months. To say the least, the area, first responders and those who were in contact were contaminated and would face long term ramifications. Fire fighters, police, and medics working the scene were exposed, but also men and women on the streets and in nearby buildings, and children in nearby schools. In many studies, it was the dust cloud that prevailed as most hazardous aspect of the attack. An effect from inhaling dust was bronchial hyper-reactivity, increased risks of asthma and chronic cough. Those who were present at the time of the attacks are still checked often, because long-term effects may eventually surface. Mesothelioma is at the forefront of concern, or consequential to exposure to asbestos. This is a disease where malignant cells grow in the protective layer of the body’s internal organs. There is

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