Examples Of Jem Being A Role Model In To Kill A Mockingbird

Improved Essays
To Kill a Mockingbird: Jem Finch No matter if someone has a older brother or sister, they will always try to be a role model for them. Jem Finch is a young boy who lives in Maycomb in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee. He has a sister called Scout who is younger than him and he wants her to look up to him. Hem is influenced by his father, Atticus Finch because Jem’s mother died when he was younger. His father is one of the only people who is his role model and who takes part to influence him. In the book, Harper Lee uses some kinds of negative influences towards Jem to show us that he is a role model to Scout. Also Jem tries to show Scout that he is one of the people that she should look up to and have as a role model. …show more content…
When Jem is talking to Scout about how he is starting to understand something about Boo Radley. Jem says “When I was you’re age. If there’s just one kind of folks, why can’t they get along with each other? If they’re all alike, why do they go out of their way to dispose each other?… I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time… it’s because he wants to stay inside” (Lee 304). He is talking and showing how he understands Boo, meanwhile most people just think of what they hear from rumors, but Jem understands and respects him and other people too. Furthermore, Jem and Scout find the different objects in the knot hole, Jem shows his respect by saying that they should write a ‘thank you’ not to the person who is giving them the things, even though they don 't know who is putting the items in the hole. When he is writing the note, Jem says, “We appreciate the—no, we appreciate everything which you have put into the tree for us. Yours very truly, Jeremy Atticus Finch” (Lee 82). This shows how Jem is respectful because even though he doesn’t know who the person is that is putting things for them in the tree. However, he feels like he should write and say thank you to show that he appreciates the things and to show respect. Another time that Jem …show more content…
When Jem and Scout meet Dill, they tell him about all the rumors about Boo Radley and Dill says, “I won’t say you ran out on a dare an’ I’ll swap you The Gray Ghost if you just go up and touch the house” (Lee 18). After this, Jem feels like he needs to show both Dill and his younger sister, Scout, that he is not afraid of anything and especially not of a dare. This has an effect on the audience because it reminds them of when they were young and that they probably did the same thing were they feel like they need to prove to people that they are not scared. In the same way, Jem shows that he is unafraid when he has to go to Mrs. Dubose to read for her, for destroying her flowers in her garden. Mrs. Dubose makes a nasty comment about how Scout is dirty, to which he answers, “My sister ain’t dirty and I ain’t scared of you” (Lee 141). Even though Jem is scared of Mrs. Dubose, and he destroyed her flowers because he got mad at her for saying things about his father, he will not show it. He wants to show and prove to both Mrs. Dubose and Scout that he is not afraid and that he is strong enough to be there inside of Mrs. Dubose’s house and reading to her. The audience feels that Jem is trying to be strong and to not show weakness in front of his younger sister. Afterwards in the novel, Jem and Scout are

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    However when the mad dog came, and Atticus shot it, she learned that Atticus was the best shot in all of Maycomb. Even though she wants to boast around school about it to prove her father was not ‘boring’, Jem tells her not to, explaining that if Atticus wanted his kids to know, he would have told them. Scout learns to listen to Jem, and understand that she does not need to be proud of her father for his talents, but his values. Another thing about Scout that has changed is her back talk. In the beginning, when Walter Cunningham was over for lunch, Scout spoke up about his eating habits.…

    • 1224 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Boo Radley Father Figure

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages

    like they were exceptin’ me” “And something else-” Jem’s voice was flat “Show you when we get home. They’ve been sewed up. Not like a lady sewed ’ em, like somethin’ I’d try to do. All crooked. It’s almost like-” “-somebody knew you were comin’ back for ‘em.” This quote show many things about Boo, it shows that he did it because he was the only one that could have seen it as well as Jem saying it must have been a male character.…

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Only Scout and her father are able to see the real Boo Radley. At first, Scout remembers the Radley house and residents from society's point of view. “Inside the House lived a malevolent phantom. [...] All stealthy crimes committed in Maycomb were his [Boo] work. [...] people still looked at the Radley place, unwilling to discard their initial suspicions” (Lee 9).…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Throughout the story, the children are trying to figure out the real reason why Boo stays indoors, but as the novel progresses they realize that there are other more important issues in society. Towards the end of the novel, Scout discovers that Boo is not the person that people illustrate him to be and he is actually a Mockingbird. One of the lessons Atticus would teach Scout is to not judge a person based on other people 's opinions instead he explained, “You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them” (374). When Scout is standing on the Radley porch she can imagine how it would have been “walking” in Boo’s shoes and life. Boo was labeled a lunatic by his neighbors like an African American was labeled guilty because…

    • 1462 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The major change occurred when Atticus accepted the Tom Robinson case. Everyone made fun of Scout for her dad's choices even though he was only doing his job. Atticus explained, “It’s never an insult to be called what somebody thinks is a bad name” (114). This informs the reader that Atticus does not let others opinions about him get to him. Scout is taught to do the same; however, she gets into one fight with a boy at school before Atticus explains all of this to her.…

    • 886 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the book Atticus tells “First of all," he said, "if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." This helps Scout at the end of the book and stand in Boo Radley’s shoes. This helps her realize why Boo stays inside and doesn’t come out into…

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This shows how even though Scout and Jem were afraid of Boo Radley based off rumors they heard of him, Boo continued to do good deeds for them in hopes that they would realize that he wasn’t a bad person after all. Atticus knew all along that Boo isn’t a bad person, so he didn’t act surprised when he Jem told him about the good things Boo had done. In the beginning of the story, Jem and Scout used to walk past the Radley Place in fear, but now, they know they have nothing to be afraid of. When Bob Ewell attacks Jem and Scout, Boo kills him protecting the children. Scout learns that Boo isn’t a monster and indirectly connects him to a character in one of Jem’s books saying, “‘An’ they chased him ‘n’ never could catch him ‘cause they didn’t know what he looked like, an’ Atticus, when they finally saw him, why he hadn’t done any of those things… Atticus, he was real nice…’” (Lee 376).…

    • 1032 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He keeps the secret of Boo killing Bob because he wants to keep Boo safe from the public eye. Although Scout is still a young girl, she understands the lasting effects of Tate’s decision and understands that this was the right thing to do. Because Scout is very mature for her age, she quickly catches on to the reason behind this white lie. Heck Tate states, “To my way of thinkin’, Mr. Finch, taking the one man whos done you and this town a great service an’ draggin’ him with his shy ways into the limelight-to me, that's a sin. It’s a sin and I’m not about to have it on my head.…

    • 718 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Here, Scout, once again, encounters Boo Radley as he saves the children from Ewell, however, she has become far more mature than she was at the beginning of the novel. As Scout finally meets Boo Radley, who she learns is actually Arthur Radley, she discovers his timid nature. As Scout watches him stand by the wall at Atticus’s house after the attack, she states, “his lips parted into a timid smile, and our neighbor’s image blurred with my sudden tears,” conveying she realized that it was Boo Radley who saved both Jem and her from great danger (270). She is moved and her view of Boo Radley has completely changed. Moreover she, now calls Boo Radley by his actual name, Arthur Radley.…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Scout takes a long time to realize what the words mean, but it helps her to understand people in the town, particularly Boo Radley. She carries his message with her through the end of the book, along with every other piece of knowledge Atticus shared in this story. Another lesson Atticus teaches his kids is to not kill mockingbirds, in a literal sense with their new rifles and otherwise. Though his message seems blunt and unimportant, it holds more meaning than how it appears on the surface. After Jem and Scout receive their rifles, Atticus warns them that they must never kill a mockingbird.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays