Examples Of Foreshadowing In A Rose For Emily

Superior Essays
There are few authors that can write a short story that is both intriguing and incorporates a full story. The story "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner wrote in 1931, has both of these things with a dark twist. Although most of Faulkner’s stories are unique such as “As I lay Dying” (1930) and “Sanctuary” (1931), the one that stands out the most to me is “A Rose for Emily”. Within this story, the two themes that are really emphasized would be death and change and it is easily seen how each theme progressed with the story. What makes “A Rose for Emily” unique is the foreshadowing in the story, the question of Emily’s sanity, and the narration is done from the towns peoples point of view. Out of many types of writing styles, foreshadowing seems to be the most intriguing since the audience knows the outcome yet does not know the path that leads to it. In this story "A Rose for Emily", there are many occurrences of foreshadowing. Miss Emily 's relationship with Homer is unwelcome in the town and her relatives are forced to try and stop it, but Emily tries to take matters into her own hands. The most daring foreshadowing event is when Emily buys arsenic from …show more content…
At a first glance, the story seems just that, a story. But through analyzing and reading further into detail, the reader can see the depth of Miss Emily. This is possible through the foreshadowing of events, which non-chronologically shows the readers the most important events. By carefully looking at Miss Emily 's characteristics and the changes through the story, the readers can also tell that there is something odd and unsound about Miss Emily and perhaps she is not completely normal. Lastly, the most interesting aspect of the story, in my opinion, is the narrator. If the reader intensely looks at the wording the author uses, the reader can draw some conclusions and raise even more questions about the dark and twisted

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