Analysis Of A Doll's House As A Feminist Play

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Sometimes a play has the ability to display a problem of society, and how people may rise over an impediment that society creates to achieve their full potential. Although it is a common view of critics to see A Doll’s House as a play which advocates for the rights of humanity, the play more specifically advocates for the rights of woman. Thus labeling A Doll’s House as a feminist play. A feminist play is one which supports the advocation for the equality between men and woman In the play A Doll’s House, Nora is the main character, a wife that is loved by her husband Torvald. Torvald treats Nora as if she is a young naive girl, and does not permit Nora to have much freedom to herself or to be independent whatsoever. But over time as the play …show more content…
According to literarydevices.net, symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are different than their literal sense. When Ibsen was writing the drama, society placed obstacles on women which did not allow them to fully express themselves. These restraints and stereotypes made it more difficult for women to obtain a career and gain independence for themselves. In A Doll’s House Torvald symbolises the constraints that society placed on females at the time. At the time the drama took place, woman were not allotted the freedom to leave their marriage if they were unhappy in their marriage. When Nora tells Torvald that she plans to leave their house to pursue her own life, Torvald tells her that this she is not allowed to this and she must stay home. Over the course of the drama Torvald exemplified traits that mirrored rules of society. In addition to Torvald symbolizing the rules of society, he also symbolizes the ignorance that man has towards woman. “This is unheard of in a girl your age! But if religion cannot lead you aright, let me try and awaken your conscience. I suppose you have some moral sense? Or- answer me- am I to think you have none? (69).” Torvald accuses Nora of not having moral senses because she intends to leave the household. Ignorance can be observed because Torvald cannot comprehend that Nora leaving will lead …show more content…
Ibsen is able to advocate for women's rights through plot context, symbolism, and dialogue between characteristics. Through plot context, Ibsen is able to advocate for women's right by character’s actions. Through symbolism, Ibsen is able to advocate for women’s rights by using characters and objects to symbolize the ideas of society. Through dialogue, Ibsen is able to advocate for women’s characters by revealing what characters think about each

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