Night By Elie Wiesel Night Analysis

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Fighting Fanaticism When looking at the novel “Night” by Elie Wiesel or his article “How Can We Understand Their Hatred” one may wonder how oppressors like the Nazis or Al Qaeda came to rise with such power without being stopped. Wiesel is a Jew who has experienced the Holocaust and has written about his experience in the novel “Night” and has responded to 9/11 in his article “How Can We Understand Their Hatred?”. Fanatics responsible for the holocaust and 9/11 must be stopped by citizens who are able to protest the government and social media users to fight indifference and in doing so, educate the public and encourage people to be compassionate towards others. Fanatics would never get the opportunity to rise to such power if people took …show more content…
Our world leaders should be compassionate in their decision-making actions so they are morally motivated to stop fanatics from getting too much power. One of Wiesel’s first experiences at the first concentration he went to was a conversation of an inmate and the someone who who just arrived where the inmate eventually said that he will “tear [him] to peices” (30). This idea of every man for himself when faced with oppression like this is a leading cause of why fanatics like the Nazis were able to rise to such power. Instead when people see oppression in their community, no matter what race is being affected, they should rebel against such fanatics. Furthermore, when government leaders see oppression in their country or in another country, they should do whatever in their power to stop fanatics. When motivated with compassion for others and not just worrying about oneself, fanaticism will not be able to thrive. When Elie and his jewish brothers and sisters first enter the concentration camp, there were “a few tough young men” who were able to attack the guards especially since some of them still had weapons (31). Throughout Wiesel’s experience in Auschwitz, the Jews outnumbered the guards, and in the beginning, they had the opportunity to, however not enough people were willing to risk their lives for the good of many others only leaving the Nazis to grow in power. If all the victims of

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