Importance Of Counter Reformation

Superior Essays
Reformation and Counter Reformation Views of the Church Martin Luther, though he was vital in bringing reform to the many travesties of the Church, created a divided within the Catholic Church based on a radical understanding and interpretation of what “church” was. Luther believed that the Catholic Church was the “historical church” which has existed in time but not necessarily always with God. It was filled with corrupt clergy, especially the pope, who were godless men, whose positions were man-made and without divine authority. Thus for many years the “true church” arose out of the mess of historical church. It is a Christian community, rather than a church, “defined by the Apostles’ Creed as a ‘communion of saints’” (The Theology of Martin Luther, 288). Luther’s personal interpretation of the Scriptures led him to dispute three aspects of the Catholic Church, which sparked the Reformation. First, the Catholic Church should submit to civil authorities, who he saw had more authority. “Since secular authorities are ordained by God to punish evil-doers and …show more content…
Frances de Sales refutes Luther and additional reformers in his The Rule of Faith. De Sales argues against based on the necessity for any institution to be one and united through a leader. In order to have any form of community, church, family or gathering of people there must be at least one person to be the head. No great organization has existed without a leader for without, there is “no head upon earth to address yourselves to in your difficulties” (The Rule of Faith, 173). de Sales refutes the reformers with the Scriptures that state that Jesus gave Peter the duty of being the head of the Church when he told him to “feed my sheep” and gave Peter the keys to the kingdom. Furthermore, throughout the bible there is references to the rock which is the foundation of kingdom. This is the same rock Jesus spoke of when he changed Simon’s name to Peter, meaning

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    (4) Martin Luther began the reformation in 1517 by posting the “95 theses”. Luther argued firstly about the transubstantiation. He said that the priests and pope have no longer close relationship with God and denied that anything changed substance during Holy Communion. He was also against the sale of indulgence by the church. This practice was about buying indulgences, could buy their own way to heaven.…

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Reformation was a time period when religious, political, and intellectual beliefs began to change. Many people at that time were Catholic and followed the beliefs and orders of the Church, mainly the Pope. Whatever the Church said, was believed to be accurate and the people at that time would do whatever it took in order to follow these rules and get into heaven. However, during the time of the Reformation, the way people started looking at the Catholic Church began to change after the influence of Martin Luther and King Henry VII. Martin Luther and King Henry VII both lived during the time of the Reformation, and were looking for change in the ways of the Church, but had different beliefs in doing so.…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Driven by a hatred of clerical corruption, Protestant reformers pushed the idea that the Bible was the only divine authority. The Reformation created a new social and political framework. Reformers such as Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and Henry VIII questioned papal authority. They thought that the Bible should have power over religious and political matters, and they also didn’t think the church had ability to define Christian practices. They also believed the church’s main source of authority should come from belief rather than tradition (Sider) (Clement) (History.com Staff).…

    • 849 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The crux of Calvin’s “Reply to Sadoleto” focuses on the theological criticisms of Roman Catholicism and the formation of Reformation theology. Calvin argues that the Roman Catholic Church first and foremost silenced the Gospel, which led to the perversion of the four things on which the safety of the church is founded, which are doctrine, discipline, the sacraments, and ceremonies (9). In order to purify these vital elements of the church, the Catholic Church needs to change its perspective on the understanding of true faith, the true church, and the authority of the universal church. Calvin believes that having the right understanding of faith is an integral part of Christian faith and a cornerstone of the church.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Martin Luther was responsible for the Protestant Reformation, which was when reformers pointed out problems with the church: corruption, simony, and sale of indulgences. During the Protestant Reformation new religions were created because reformers did not agree with Catholic Church. The Protestant Reformation had an effect in the Europeans’ society, economy, and the politics. Some effect influenced the European society but others led to diversity.…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Protestant Reformation was the 16th-century religious, political, intellectual and cultural mayhem that fractured Catholic Europe, changing the Catholic Religion beliefs in Europe in the modern era. The protest of the Catholic Church was sparked by Martin Luther posting his Ninety-Five Theses on the door of his towns church the All Saints Church. The sudden Challenge of the church brought about visions of the Apocalypse on each side of the reformation. The one characteristic that made the reformation effective was the ability to spread the ideas opposing the current church structure.…

    • 441 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Reformation Dbq

    • 1151 Words
    • 5 Pages

    He blames the clergy for their insolence by misconstruing Scripture and persuading the congregation to blindly accept their words. Since the Church has been wrong so many times in the past, even the claimed inerrant Pope, how are people to know unless someone else should prove it. Luther ends this section by solidifying his abhorrence of this policy and the how utterly defenseless they are to this claim. The last section of Luther’s essay addresses the fallibility of the Church’s efficacy of interpreting Scripture. Here Luther states referring to himself, “the first man who is able should… do what he can to bring about a truly free council [to oppose the Pope]”…

    • 1151 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Amongst them, three causes of the Protestant Reformation were Luther’s disagreement with the Church’s view on religion, the German bible and the propaganda he published and the selling of indulgences. Firstly, one of the causes of the…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Protestant Reformation was a time in which change ran rampant throughout Europe, both religiously and politically. The idea that rather than there being no salvation outside the Church, and that the way to salvation was merely through the hierarchy of the church, or that rather than seeking God through a "father confessor" one could seek him through prayer instead, became a big challenge on the Roman Catholic Church, one that seemed to be headed by one particular man... Martin Luther. Martin Luther was originally a law student who after being struck to the ground by lightning and calling out to Saint Anne promised that he would commit himself to being a monk in return for his survival, this was only the beginning for him though. Luther…

    • 340 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Martin Luther was an influential scholar in the 16th century who changed the face of the Catholic church by sparking the beginning of the Protestant Reformation. To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation is one of the first works written by Luther in 1520. The text gives the reader an insight into the life of Luther, while he exhorts and rebukes the authority and ideals of the Roman Catholic Church. Within the text, Luther challenges the three main ideals of the Church and insinuates an ecclesiastical movement. Furthermore, I agree with Luther’s approach to completely disband all the metaphorical walls that the Romanists have developed in the attempt to revolutionize Church and State.…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This drew the Augustinian monk, who later became a priest, Martin Luther to remove himself from the church and practice a new meaning of faith. The Protestant reformation was a religions movement, however there was a lot more than just religion that needed to be reformed during this time. There was a lot of corruption, secularism, and a growing theocracy. These problems became…

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In The Humanistic Tradition the author, Gloria Fiero presents Martin Luther as the voice of the religious reform movement against the abuses of the Church of Rome. Martin Luther's revolt against the church was an attempt to put an end to “the misery and wretchedness of Christendom” (Friero, Pg. 475). Hence he insisted that the way to find peace with God was through having heartful faith in God. Thus this idea contradicted some of the corrupt behaviors that the church was practicing such as indulgences. Consequently, Martin Luther’s attempt to reform Catholicism through his work…

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Martin Luther had conflicting theology with the Catholic Church. He believed that you couldn 't earn salvation through good work but through faith alone. He states that humans are weak and sinful creatures who aren’t able to reach salvation on their own. Luther also believed that the Bible was the only source of religious authority which differed from the Catholic idea that philosophy and scholars had religious authority as well. Since Martin Luther felt so strongly about these topics he distributed a document called “Ninety Five Theses” which criticized the Catholic Church and their teachings.…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Protestant Reformation was a religious revolution lead by Martin Luther and John Calvin. The Roman Catholic Church of the medieval world was complex and had its hand in the politics, especially the papacy, of Western Europe. The Churches increasing power and wealth along with their political influence corrupted the church’s spirituality. The chief of the liberal Catholic Reform attacked favored superstitions, which revealed the concerns of the within the church. Martin Luther claimed that his reform was different because it focused on the church’s doctrine of redemption and grace, the underlying cause of the problems.…

    • 2026 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What forces were most important in determining the spread of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation? The reformation refers to the 16th-century movement for the reform of the Roman Catholic Church based on Martin Luther’s criticisms. The Catholic Church responded with the counter-reformation. This addressed some key criticism but retained central beliefs such as the intervening role of the clergy and saints in one’s relationship with God.…

    • 1862 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays