Example Of Spiritual Discipline

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The rubber meets the road when it comes to observing our spiritual disciplines. Do we genuinely believe the truth of the Holy Scriptures? Do we faithfully desire to obey Jesus? Will any of this make a difference? Undoubtedly, some form of these questions arises to our mind when engaging with spiritual disciplines. For me, this has been an area for me to humbly cry as the loving father in Mark 9:24 cries out, “I believe; help my unbelief!” Personally, I strive to take II Peter 1:5-7 seriously and quite literally (“make every effort to support your faith […]”). That said, I am just as broken as anyone, succumbing to even the silliest of temptations and distractions. Presently, eight of my primary spiritual disciplines are – beginning with the …show more content…
Practically, this one seems to be the most challenging to me, yet, it would be one of my favorite practices – perhaps partly because I am an introvert. Nevertheless, introvert or not, this practice develops a crucial habit, much needed in Western culture, of slowing down and listening, specifically to God. Often times in my struggle with speaking on the fly I compensate by rambling on and on, trying to make sense of what I am struggling to say, but never stopping to listen. Miller conveys the story of a consultant saying he lacked passion apparently because he did not comment a lot, to which he says it was because he was often praying for help. Similarly, this idea aptly applies to silence and solitude. Sometimes, God desires us simply to sit still and silent before him and await his help or direction, to listen quietly and patiently. The most common defeater to this is finding quiet alone time in the midst of family and church. Yet again, if I am honest, much of this struggle is not because there is not available or appropriate times, but because I have simply failed to prioritize and schedule them …show more content…
In talking about the discipline of worship, Whitney notes, “The more we focus on God, the more we understand and appreciate His infinite worth. As we understand and appreciate this, we can’t help but respond to Him. Just as an indescribable sunset or a breathtaking mountaintop vista evokes a spontaneous response, so we cannot encourage the worthiness of God without the response.” One of the better definitions of worship is when we stand before the holiness, goodness, and mystery of God and cannot help but be overcome with awe. As the Psalmist puts it, “Let all the earth fear the LORD; let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him” (Psalm 33:8). One area in the practice of worship in which I must remain sensitive is thanksgiving. I struggle with gratitude and tend towards pessimism, which can often lead me to overlook the vast goodness and beauty of God at work in me, through me, and around me. This has been a frequent and routine area of repentance, and as of late I have found myself challenged to proclaim my thanksgivings to others as an act of obedience and

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