Example Of Feminism Essay

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Feminism can be traced the history back in the 1960 where liberal movements by women around the world were started for various reasons. In different regions and cultures of the world, feminism took a different view for various reasons. Women such as Pat Mainard in the year 1969 played an important role in women liberalization. The concept of consciousness was adopted by most feminists where some powerful leaders of the world termed it as crazy. The essay below will evaluate and analyze the differences in black, white and Hispanic communities on this issue of feminism.
Feminism was adopted by different communities of the world. To start with, the black community that was mostly referred to as Negros had its struggles when trying to air their
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However, women in this community were supposed to provide for their families in matters of food, housing, and more so be keen in childcare. Although there were different human rights groups that tried to spread and promote this issue of feminism, it was not successful in this community due to the political ideologies in this community that undermined the role of women in this community. However, this was different in the white community. The liberation movement in this community was spearheaded by the middle class who fought for equality in places of work as well as equal pay with their male counterparts. This is because women were expected to play just domestic roles where they were not supposed to take part in any leadership positions. Additionally, they were supposed to make themselves attractive to men. One of the issues that led to the rise of feminism in the white community is the need to fight for legal abortion when the life of the mother was in danger. It is evident that feminism faced much opposition from different communities. However, women around the world have stood strong to fight for their rights. In conclusion, it is clear that the concept of feminism faced various challenges from different

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